Mobile Speed Camera Location, A579 Atherleigh Way from approx. 215m S of jct with St Helen’s Rd to jct with East Lancs Rd

Address:
A579 Atherleigh Way from approx. 215m S of jct with St Helen’s Rd to jct with East Lancs Rd


Taken from
“This list is an indication of where the community concern mobile enforcement vehicle may park. It is not necessarily the exact location. Enforcement can take place anywhere within a buffer.
The Police have discretion to undertake speed enforcement anywhere within the Greater Manchester area, activity which is separate to and not funded by or through the Partnership, and not subject to the Partnership’s scrutiny or protocols.”

Relevant numbers:

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVLA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 507 7920
Car Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 2173
Driving Licence (general) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8928
Driving Test Booking (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8930
VOSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7344
DVSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
Road Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2576
Personalised Registration Plates (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8922
Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0226
Provisional Licence (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8927
Theory Test (bookings) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8924
Medical Issues (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7271
V5C and Log Books (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075
Driver Check Service (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075

About DVLA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA; Welsh: Asiantaeth Trwyddedu Gyrwyr a Cherbydau) is the organisation of the UK government responsible for maintaining a database of drivers in Great Britain and a database of vehicles for the entire United Kingdom. Its counterpart for drivers in Northern Ireland is the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA). The agency issues driving licences, organises collection of vehicle excise duty (also known as road tax and road fund licence) and sells personalised registrations.

The DVLA is an executive agency of the Department for Transport (DfT). The current Chief Executive of the agency is Oliver Morley.[1]

The DVLA is based in Swansea, Wales, with a prominent 16-storey building in Clase and offices in Swansea Vale. It was previously known as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC). The agency previously had a network of 39 offices around Great Britain, known as the Local Office Network, where users could attend to apply for licences and transact other business, but in the early 21st century the local offices were completely closed by December 2013. The agency’s work is consequently fully centralised in Swansea, with the majority of users having to transact remotely – by post or (for some transactions) by phone.[2]

DVLA introduced Electronic Vehicle Licensing (EVL) in 2004, allowing customers to pay vehicle excise duty online and by telephone.[3] However, customers still have the option to tax their vehicles via the Post Office. A seven-year contract enabling the Post Office to continue to process car tax applications was agreed in November 2012, with the option of a three-year extension.[4]

Originally, vehicle registration was the responsibility of Borough and County councils throughout Great Britain, a system created by the Motor Car Act 1903. The licensing system was centralised in 1965 and administered from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC) in Swansea. In 1990, the DVLC was renamed as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA), becoming an executive agency of Department for Transport.[5]

British Forces Germany civilian vehicles[edit]
Civilian vehicles used in Germany by members of British Forces Germany or their families are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Ministry of Defence.

Diplomatic and consular vehicles[edit]
Official diplomatic and consular vehicles are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

DVLA database[edit]

Pre-2012 logo of DVLA
The vehicle register held by DVLA is used in many ways. For example, by the DVLA itself to identify untaxed vehicles, and by outside agencies to identify keepers of cars entering central London who have not paid the congestion charge, or who exceed speed limits on a road that has speed cameras by matching the cars to their keepers utilising the DVLA database. The current DVLA vehicle register was built by EDS under a £5 million contract signed in 1996, with a planned implementation date on October 1998, though actual implementation was delayed by a year. It uses a client�”server architecture and uses the vehicle identification number, rather than the registration plate, as the primary key to track vehicles, eliminating the possibility of having multiple registrations for a single vehicle.

The Vehicle Identity Check (VIC) was introduced to help reduce vehicle crime. It is intended to deter criminals from disguising stolen cars with the identity of written off or scrapped vehicles however this scheme was later scrapped in October 2014.

When an insurance company writes off a car, the registration document (V5 logbook) is surrendered to them and destroyed. The insurance company will then notify the DVLA that the vehicle has been written off. This notification will set a “VIC marker” on the vehicle record on the DVLA database.

DVLA database records are used by commercial vehicle check companies to offer a comprehensive individual car check to prospective purchasers.

However, the accuracy of the data held remains a continuing problem.[citation needed] Anyone can request information from the database if they purport to have just cause to need it, for a fee of £2.50.[6]

The database of drivers, developed in the late 1980s, holds details of some 42 million driving licence holders in the UK. It is used to produce driving licences and to assist bodies such as the Driving Standards Agency, police and courts in the enforcement of legislation concerning driving entitlements and road safety.

The DVLA revealed in December 2012 that it had temporarily banned 294 public bodies, including local councils and police forces, for not using their access to the database correctly between 2006 and 2012. A further 38 bodies were banned permanently during the period.[7]

Financial information[edit]
Between 2002 and 2015 it is estimated that the DVLA will spend £500 million on information technology from IBM.[8]

Employment[edit]
Staff of the DVLA are predominantly female whereas other parts of the Department for Transport are predominantly male. Starting salaries are just over £12,500.[9] In November 2007, a Public Accounts Committee report criticised the “amazingly high” levels of sick leave among staff at the DVLA, where employees took an average of three weeks per year of sick leave. The report said that overall sickness leave at the DfT and its seven agencies averaged 10.4 working days per full-time employee in 2005, which they calculated as costing taxpayers £24 million. While sick leave rates at the department itself and four of its agencies were below average�”at the DVLA and DSA, which together employ more than 50% of all DfT staff�”they were “significantly higher”. Committee chairman Edward Leigh said it was surprising the agencies could “function adequately”.[10] In 2008 DVLA staff went on a one-day strike over pay inequality arguing that they should receive similar salaries to other employees of the Department for Transport.[9] The most recent level of sickness absence for 2012/13 was 6.7 days.[11]

Advertising[edit]
The DVLA uses advertising to warn drivers that if they do not pay their road tax, their cars may be crushed.[12]

Controversies[edit]
Missing documents[edit]
In 2006, 120,000 to 130,000 vehicle registration certificates went missing. A BBC investigation in 2010 found that vehicles worth £13 million had been stolen using the documents in the 18 months preceding the investigation. Around ten cars are found each week to have forged log books and police said it would be decades before they were all recovered.[13]

DVLA letter bombs[edit]
Main article: 2007 United Kingdom letter bombs
On 7 February 2007, a letter bomb was sent to the DVLA in Swansea and injured four people. It is suspected that this is part of a group of letter bombs sent to other organisations that deal with the administration of motoring charges and offences, such as Capita in central London, which was targeted a few days earlier. Miles Cooper, aged 27, a school caretaker, was arrested on 19 February 2007, and charged on 22 February. The DVLA have since installed X-Ray machines in all post opening areas to reduce the effectiveness of any further attacks.

Wrong confidential records on surveys[edit]
In December 2007, it was revealed that while sending out surveys to 1,215 drivers, the DVLA sent out confidential details, but to the wrong owners. The error occurred during the sending out of routine surveys, and was not discovered until members of the public contacted the DVLA to notify them of the error.[14]

Lost entitlements[edit]
In 2009 BBC’s Watchdog reported that entitlements, specifically the entitlement to drive a motorcycle, were being lost from reissued driving licences.[15] In 2005 the same programme highlighted drivers who had lost entitlements to drive heavy goods vehicles in a similar way.

Sale of details[edit]
In 2010 it was revealed that the DVLA had sold drivers’ details from the database to certain private parking enforcement companies run by individuals with criminal records. The DVLA sells details to companies for £2.50, but it was found that the agency had sold some of these to a business which had been fined weeks before for unfair business practices.[16]

Mobile Speed Camera Location, Queensway from approx. 99m south of Green Ln to near jct with Regent Drive

Address:
Queensway from approx. 99m south of Green Ln to near jct with Regent Drive


Taken from
“This list is an indication of where the community concern mobile enforcement vehicle may park. It is not necessarily the exact location. Enforcement can take place anywhere within a buffer.
The Police have discretion to undertake speed enforcement anywhere within the Greater Manchester area, activity which is separate to and not funded by or through the Partnership, and not subject to the Partnership’s scrutiny or protocols.”

Relevant numbers:

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVLA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 507 7920
Car Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 2173
Driving Licence (general) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8928
Driving Test Booking (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8930
VOSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7344
DVSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
Road Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2576
Personalised Registration Plates (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8922
Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0226
Provisional Licence (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8927
Theory Test (bookings) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8924
Medical Issues (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7271
V5C and Log Books (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075
Driver Check Service (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075

About DVLA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA; Welsh: Asiantaeth Trwyddedu Gyrwyr a Cherbydau) is the organisation of the UK government responsible for maintaining a database of drivers in Great Britain and a database of vehicles for the entire United Kingdom. Its counterpart for drivers in Northern Ireland is the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA). The agency issues driving licences, organises collection of vehicle excise duty (also known as road tax and road fund licence) and sells personalised registrations.

The DVLA is an executive agency of the Department for Transport (DfT). The current Chief Executive of the agency is Oliver Morley.[1]

The DVLA is based in Swansea, Wales, with a prominent 16-storey building in Clase and offices in Swansea Vale. It was previously known as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC). The agency previously had a network of 39 offices around Great Britain, known as the Local Office Network, where users could attend to apply for licences and transact other business, but in the early 21st century the local offices were completely closed by December 2013. The agency’s work is consequently fully centralised in Swansea, with the majority of users having to transact remotely – by post or (for some transactions) by phone.[2]

DVLA introduced Electronic Vehicle Licensing (EVL) in 2004, allowing customers to pay vehicle excise duty online and by telephone.[3] However, customers still have the option to tax their vehicles via the Post Office. A seven-year contract enabling the Post Office to continue to process car tax applications was agreed in November 2012, with the option of a three-year extension.[4]

Originally, vehicle registration was the responsibility of Borough and County councils throughout Great Britain, a system created by the Motor Car Act 1903. The licensing system was centralised in 1965 and administered from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC) in Swansea. In 1990, the DVLC was renamed as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA), becoming an executive agency of Department for Transport.[5]

British Forces Germany civilian vehicles[edit]
Civilian vehicles used in Germany by members of British Forces Germany or their families are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Ministry of Defence.

Diplomatic and consular vehicles[edit]
Official diplomatic and consular vehicles are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

DVLA database[edit]

Pre-2012 logo of DVLA
The vehicle register held by DVLA is used in many ways. For example, by the DVLA itself to identify untaxed vehicles, and by outside agencies to identify keepers of cars entering central London who have not paid the congestion charge, or who exceed speed limits on a road that has speed cameras by matching the cars to their keepers utilising the DVLA database. The current DVLA vehicle register was built by EDS under a £5 million contract signed in 1996, with a planned implementation date on October 1998, though actual implementation was delayed by a year. It uses a client�”server architecture and uses the vehicle identification number, rather than the registration plate, as the primary key to track vehicles, eliminating the possibility of having multiple registrations for a single vehicle.

The Vehicle Identity Check (VIC) was introduced to help reduce vehicle crime. It is intended to deter criminals from disguising stolen cars with the identity of written off or scrapped vehicles however this scheme was later scrapped in October 2014.

When an insurance company writes off a car, the registration document (V5 logbook) is surrendered to them and destroyed. The insurance company will then notify the DVLA that the vehicle has been written off. This notification will set a “VIC marker” on the vehicle record on the DVLA database.

DVLA database records are used by commercial vehicle check companies to offer a comprehensive individual car check to prospective purchasers.

However, the accuracy of the data held remains a continuing problem.[citation needed] Anyone can request information from the database if they purport to have just cause to need it, for a fee of £2.50.[6]

The database of drivers, developed in the late 1980s, holds details of some 42 million driving licence holders in the UK. It is used to produce driving licences and to assist bodies such as the Driving Standards Agency, police and courts in the enforcement of legislation concerning driving entitlements and road safety.

The DVLA revealed in December 2012 that it had temporarily banned 294 public bodies, including local councils and police forces, for not using their access to the database correctly between 2006 and 2012. A further 38 bodies were banned permanently during the period.[7]

Financial information[edit]
Between 2002 and 2015 it is estimated that the DVLA will spend £500 million on information technology from IBM.[8]

Employment[edit]
Staff of the DVLA are predominantly female whereas other parts of the Department for Transport are predominantly male. Starting salaries are just over £12,500.[9] In November 2007, a Public Accounts Committee report criticised the “amazingly high” levels of sick leave among staff at the DVLA, where employees took an average of three weeks per year of sick leave. The report said that overall sickness leave at the DfT and its seven agencies averaged 10.4 working days per full-time employee in 2005, which they calculated as costing taxpayers £24 million. While sick leave rates at the department itself and four of its agencies were below average�”at the DVLA and DSA, which together employ more than 50% of all DfT staff�”they were “significantly higher”. Committee chairman Edward Leigh said it was surprising the agencies could “function adequately”.[10] In 2008 DVLA staff went on a one-day strike over pay inequality arguing that they should receive similar salaries to other employees of the Department for Transport.[9] The most recent level of sickness absence for 2012/13 was 6.7 days.[11]

Advertising[edit]
The DVLA uses advertising to warn drivers that if they do not pay their road tax, their cars may be crushed.[12]

Controversies[edit]
Missing documents[edit]
In 2006, 120,000 to 130,000 vehicle registration certificates went missing. A BBC investigation in 2010 found that vehicles worth £13 million had been stolen using the documents in the 18 months preceding the investigation. Around ten cars are found each week to have forged log books and police said it would be decades before they were all recovered.[13]

DVLA letter bombs[edit]
Main article: 2007 United Kingdom letter bombs
On 7 February 2007, a letter bomb was sent to the DVLA in Swansea and injured four people. It is suspected that this is part of a group of letter bombs sent to other organisations that deal with the administration of motoring charges and offences, such as Capita in central London, which was targeted a few days earlier. Miles Cooper, aged 27, a school caretaker, was arrested on 19 February 2007, and charged on 22 February. The DVLA have since installed X-Ray machines in all post opening areas to reduce the effectiveness of any further attacks.

Wrong confidential records on surveys[edit]
In December 2007, it was revealed that while sending out surveys to 1,215 drivers, the DVLA sent out confidential details, but to the wrong owners. The error occurred during the sending out of routine surveys, and was not discovered until members of the public contacted the DVLA to notify them of the error.[14]

Lost entitlements[edit]
In 2009 BBC’s Watchdog reported that entitlements, specifically the entitlement to drive a motorcycle, were being lost from reissued driving licences.[15] In 2005 the same programme highlighted drivers who had lost entitlements to drive heavy goods vehicles in a similar way.

Sale of details[edit]
In 2010 it was revealed that the DVLA had sold drivers’ details from the database to certain private parking enforcement companies run by individuals with criminal records. The DVLA sells details to companies for £2.50, but it was found that the agency had sold some of these to a business which had been fined weeks before for unfair business practices.[16]

Mobile Speed Camera Location, A49 Warrington Rd roundabout with B5238 Poolstock Ln for approx. 600m in S direction

Address:
A49 Warrington Rd roundabout with B5238 Poolstock Ln for approx. 600m in S direction


Taken from
“This list is an indication of where the community concern mobile enforcement vehicle may park. It is not necessarily the exact location. Enforcement can take place anywhere within a buffer.
The Police have discretion to undertake speed enforcement anywhere within the Greater Manchester area, activity which is separate to and not funded by or through the Partnership, and not subject to the Partnership’s scrutiny or protocols.”

Relevant numbers:

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVLA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 507 7920
Car Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 2173
Driving Licence (general) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8928
Driving Test Booking (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8930
VOSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7344
DVSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
Road Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2576
Personalised Registration Plates (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8922
Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0226
Provisional Licence (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8927
Theory Test (bookings) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8924
Medical Issues (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7271
V5C and Log Books (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075
Driver Check Service (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075

About DVLA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA; Welsh: Asiantaeth Trwyddedu Gyrwyr a Cherbydau) is the organisation of the UK government responsible for maintaining a database of drivers in Great Britain and a database of vehicles for the entire United Kingdom. Its counterpart for drivers in Northern Ireland is the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA). The agency issues driving licences, organises collection of vehicle excise duty (also known as road tax and road fund licence) and sells personalised registrations.

The DVLA is an executive agency of the Department for Transport (DfT). The current Chief Executive of the agency is Oliver Morley.[1]

The DVLA is based in Swansea, Wales, with a prominent 16-storey building in Clase and offices in Swansea Vale. It was previously known as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC). The agency previously had a network of 39 offices around Great Britain, known as the Local Office Network, where users could attend to apply for licences and transact other business, but in the early 21st century the local offices were completely closed by December 2013. The agency’s work is consequently fully centralised in Swansea, with the majority of users having to transact remotely – by post or (for some transactions) by phone.[2]

DVLA introduced Electronic Vehicle Licensing (EVL) in 2004, allowing customers to pay vehicle excise duty online and by telephone.[3] However, customers still have the option to tax their vehicles via the Post Office. A seven-year contract enabling the Post Office to continue to process car tax applications was agreed in November 2012, with the option of a three-year extension.[4]

Originally, vehicle registration was the responsibility of Borough and County councils throughout Great Britain, a system created by the Motor Car Act 1903. The licensing system was centralised in 1965 and administered from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC) in Swansea. In 1990, the DVLC was renamed as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA), becoming an executive agency of Department for Transport.[5]

British Forces Germany civilian vehicles[edit]
Civilian vehicles used in Germany by members of British Forces Germany or their families are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Ministry of Defence.

Diplomatic and consular vehicles[edit]
Official diplomatic and consular vehicles are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

DVLA database[edit]

Pre-2012 logo of DVLA
The vehicle register held by DVLA is used in many ways. For example, by the DVLA itself to identify untaxed vehicles, and by outside agencies to identify keepers of cars entering central London who have not paid the congestion charge, or who exceed speed limits on a road that has speed cameras by matching the cars to their keepers utilising the DVLA database. The current DVLA vehicle register was built by EDS under a £5 million contract signed in 1996, with a planned implementation date on October 1998, though actual implementation was delayed by a year. It uses a client�”server architecture and uses the vehicle identification number, rather than the registration plate, as the primary key to track vehicles, eliminating the possibility of having multiple registrations for a single vehicle.

The Vehicle Identity Check (VIC) was introduced to help reduce vehicle crime. It is intended to deter criminals from disguising stolen cars with the identity of written off or scrapped vehicles however this scheme was later scrapped in October 2014.

When an insurance company writes off a car, the registration document (V5 logbook) is surrendered to them and destroyed. The insurance company will then notify the DVLA that the vehicle has been written off. This notification will set a “VIC marker” on the vehicle record on the DVLA database.

DVLA database records are used by commercial vehicle check companies to offer a comprehensive individual car check to prospective purchasers.

However, the accuracy of the data held remains a continuing problem.[citation needed] Anyone can request information from the database if they purport to have just cause to need it, for a fee of £2.50.[6]

The database of drivers, developed in the late 1980s, holds details of some 42 million driving licence holders in the UK. It is used to produce driving licences and to assist bodies such as the Driving Standards Agency, police and courts in the enforcement of legislation concerning driving entitlements and road safety.

The DVLA revealed in December 2012 that it had temporarily banned 294 public bodies, including local councils and police forces, for not using their access to the database correctly between 2006 and 2012. A further 38 bodies were banned permanently during the period.[7]

Financial information[edit]
Between 2002 and 2015 it is estimated that the DVLA will spend £500 million on information technology from IBM.[8]

Employment[edit]
Staff of the DVLA are predominantly female whereas other parts of the Department for Transport are predominantly male. Starting salaries are just over £12,500.[9] In November 2007, a Public Accounts Committee report criticised the “amazingly high” levels of sick leave among staff at the DVLA, where employees took an average of three weeks per year of sick leave. The report said that overall sickness leave at the DfT and its seven agencies averaged 10.4 working days per full-time employee in 2005, which they calculated as costing taxpayers £24 million. While sick leave rates at the department itself and four of its agencies were below average�”at the DVLA and DSA, which together employ more than 50% of all DfT staff�”they were “significantly higher”. Committee chairman Edward Leigh said it was surprising the agencies could “function adequately”.[10] In 2008 DVLA staff went on a one-day strike over pay inequality arguing that they should receive similar salaries to other employees of the Department for Transport.[9] The most recent level of sickness absence for 2012/13 was 6.7 days.[11]

Advertising[edit]
The DVLA uses advertising to warn drivers that if they do not pay their road tax, their cars may be crushed.[12]

Controversies[edit]
Missing documents[edit]
In 2006, 120,000 to 130,000 vehicle registration certificates went missing. A BBC investigation in 2010 found that vehicles worth £13 million had been stolen using the documents in the 18 months preceding the investigation. Around ten cars are found each week to have forged log books and police said it would be decades before they were all recovered.[13]

DVLA letter bombs[edit]
Main article: 2007 United Kingdom letter bombs
On 7 February 2007, a letter bomb was sent to the DVLA in Swansea and injured four people. It is suspected that this is part of a group of letter bombs sent to other organisations that deal with the administration of motoring charges and offences, such as Capita in central London, which was targeted a few days earlier. Miles Cooper, aged 27, a school caretaker, was arrested on 19 February 2007, and charged on 22 February. The DVLA have since installed X-Ray machines in all post opening areas to reduce the effectiveness of any further attacks.

Wrong confidential records on surveys[edit]
In December 2007, it was revealed that while sending out surveys to 1,215 drivers, the DVLA sent out confidential details, but to the wrong owners. The error occurred during the sending out of routine surveys, and was not discovered until members of the public contacted the DVLA to notify them of the error.[14]

Lost entitlements[edit]
In 2009 BBC’s Watchdog reported that entitlements, specifically the entitlement to drive a motorcycle, were being lost from reissued driving licences.[15] In 2005 the same programme highlighted drivers who had lost entitlements to drive heavy goods vehicles in a similar way.

Sale of details[edit]
In 2010 it was revealed that the DVLA had sold drivers’ details from the database to certain private parking enforcement companies run by individuals with criminal records. The DVLA sells details to companies for £2.50, but it was found that the agency had sold some of these to a business which had been fined weeks before for unfair business practices.[16]

Mobile Speed Camera Location, A5209 Crow Orchard Rd from near M6 roundabout to approx. 73m NW of Shevington Ln

Address:
A5209 Crow Orchard Rd from near M6 roundabout to approx. 73m NW of Shevington Ln


Taken from
“This list is an indication of where the community concern mobile enforcement vehicle may park. It is not necessarily the exact location. Enforcement can take place anywhere within a buffer.
The Police have discretion to undertake speed enforcement anywhere within the Greater Manchester area, activity which is separate to and not funded by or through the Partnership, and not subject to the Partnership’s scrutiny or protocols.”

Relevant numbers:

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVLA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 507 7920
Car Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 2173
Driving Licence (general) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8928
Driving Test Booking (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8930
VOSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7344
DVSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
Road Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2576
Personalised Registration Plates (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8922
Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0226
Provisional Licence (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8927
Theory Test (bookings) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8924
Medical Issues (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7271
V5C and Log Books (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075
Driver Check Service (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075

About DVLA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA; Welsh: Asiantaeth Trwyddedu Gyrwyr a Cherbydau) is the organisation of the UK government responsible for maintaining a database of drivers in Great Britain and a database of vehicles for the entire United Kingdom. Its counterpart for drivers in Northern Ireland is the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA). The agency issues driving licences, organises collection of vehicle excise duty (also known as road tax and road fund licence) and sells personalised registrations.

The DVLA is an executive agency of the Department for Transport (DfT). The current Chief Executive of the agency is Oliver Morley.[1]

The DVLA is based in Swansea, Wales, with a prominent 16-storey building in Clase and offices in Swansea Vale. It was previously known as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC). The agency previously had a network of 39 offices around Great Britain, known as the Local Office Network, where users could attend to apply for licences and transact other business, but in the early 21st century the local offices were completely closed by December 2013. The agency’s work is consequently fully centralised in Swansea, with the majority of users having to transact remotely – by post or (for some transactions) by phone.[2]

DVLA introduced Electronic Vehicle Licensing (EVL) in 2004, allowing customers to pay vehicle excise duty online and by telephone.[3] However, customers still have the option to tax their vehicles via the Post Office. A seven-year contract enabling the Post Office to continue to process car tax applications was agreed in November 2012, with the option of a three-year extension.[4]

Originally, vehicle registration was the responsibility of Borough and County councils throughout Great Britain, a system created by the Motor Car Act 1903. The licensing system was centralised in 1965 and administered from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC) in Swansea. In 1990, the DVLC was renamed as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA), becoming an executive agency of Department for Transport.[5]

British Forces Germany civilian vehicles[edit]
Civilian vehicles used in Germany by members of British Forces Germany or their families are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Ministry of Defence.

Diplomatic and consular vehicles[edit]
Official diplomatic and consular vehicles are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

DVLA database[edit]

Pre-2012 logo of DVLA
The vehicle register held by DVLA is used in many ways. For example, by the DVLA itself to identify untaxed vehicles, and by outside agencies to identify keepers of cars entering central London who have not paid the congestion charge, or who exceed speed limits on a road that has speed cameras by matching the cars to their keepers utilising the DVLA database. The current DVLA vehicle register was built by EDS under a £5 million contract signed in 1996, with a planned implementation date on October 1998, though actual implementation was delayed by a year. It uses a client�”server architecture and uses the vehicle identification number, rather than the registration plate, as the primary key to track vehicles, eliminating the possibility of having multiple registrations for a single vehicle.

The Vehicle Identity Check (VIC) was introduced to help reduce vehicle crime. It is intended to deter criminals from disguising stolen cars with the identity of written off or scrapped vehicles however this scheme was later scrapped in October 2014.

When an insurance company writes off a car, the registration document (V5 logbook) is surrendered to them and destroyed. The insurance company will then notify the DVLA that the vehicle has been written off. This notification will set a “VIC marker” on the vehicle record on the DVLA database.

DVLA database records are used by commercial vehicle check companies to offer a comprehensive individual car check to prospective purchasers.

However, the accuracy of the data held remains a continuing problem.[citation needed] Anyone can request information from the database if they purport to have just cause to need it, for a fee of £2.50.[6]

The database of drivers, developed in the late 1980s, holds details of some 42 million driving licence holders in the UK. It is used to produce driving licences and to assist bodies such as the Driving Standards Agency, police and courts in the enforcement of legislation concerning driving entitlements and road safety.

The DVLA revealed in December 2012 that it had temporarily banned 294 public bodies, including local councils and police forces, for not using their access to the database correctly between 2006 and 2012. A further 38 bodies were banned permanently during the period.[7]

Financial information[edit]
Between 2002 and 2015 it is estimated that the DVLA will spend £500 million on information technology from IBM.[8]

Employment[edit]
Staff of the DVLA are predominantly female whereas other parts of the Department for Transport are predominantly male. Starting salaries are just over £12,500.[9] In November 2007, a Public Accounts Committee report criticised the “amazingly high” levels of sick leave among staff at the DVLA, where employees took an average of three weeks per year of sick leave. The report said that overall sickness leave at the DfT and its seven agencies averaged 10.4 working days per full-time employee in 2005, which they calculated as costing taxpayers £24 million. While sick leave rates at the department itself and four of its agencies were below average�”at the DVLA and DSA, which together employ more than 50% of all DfT staff�”they were “significantly higher”. Committee chairman Edward Leigh said it was surprising the agencies could “function adequately”.[10] In 2008 DVLA staff went on a one-day strike over pay inequality arguing that they should receive similar salaries to other employees of the Department for Transport.[9] The most recent level of sickness absence for 2012/13 was 6.7 days.[11]

Advertising[edit]
The DVLA uses advertising to warn drivers that if they do not pay their road tax, their cars may be crushed.[12]

Controversies[edit]
Missing documents[edit]
In 2006, 120,000 to 130,000 vehicle registration certificates went missing. A BBC investigation in 2010 found that vehicles worth £13 million had been stolen using the documents in the 18 months preceding the investigation. Around ten cars are found each week to have forged log books and police said it would be decades before they were all recovered.[13]

DVLA letter bombs[edit]
Main article: 2007 United Kingdom letter bombs
On 7 February 2007, a letter bomb was sent to the DVLA in Swansea and injured four people. It is suspected that this is part of a group of letter bombs sent to other organisations that deal with the administration of motoring charges and offences, such as Capita in central London, which was targeted a few days earlier. Miles Cooper, aged 27, a school caretaker, was arrested on 19 February 2007, and charged on 22 February. The DVLA have since installed X-Ray machines in all post opening areas to reduce the effectiveness of any further attacks.

Wrong confidential records on surveys[edit]
In December 2007, it was revealed that while sending out surveys to 1,215 drivers, the DVLA sent out confidential details, but to the wrong owners. The error occurred during the sending out of routine surveys, and was not discovered until members of the public contacted the DVLA to notify them of the error.[14]

Lost entitlements[edit]
In 2009 BBC’s Watchdog reported that entitlements, specifically the entitlement to drive a motorcycle, were being lost from reissued driving licences.[15] In 2005 the same programme highlighted drivers who had lost entitlements to drive heavy goods vehicles in a similar way.

Sale of details[edit]
In 2010 it was revealed that the DVLA had sold drivers’ details from the database to certain private parking enforcement companies run by individuals with criminal records. The DVLA sells details to companies for £2.50, but it was found that the agency had sold some of these to a business which had been fined weeks before for unfair business practices.[16]

Mobile Speed Camera Location, A580 East Lancs Rd from Dismantled Railway to Bowland Field in SW direction

Address:
A580 East Lancs Rd from Dismantled Railway to Bowland Field in SW direction


Taken from
“This list is an indication of where the community concern mobile enforcement vehicle may park. It is not necessarily the exact location. Enforcement can take place anywhere within a buffer.
The Police have discretion to undertake speed enforcement anywhere within the Greater Manchester area, activity which is separate to and not funded by or through the Partnership, and not subject to the Partnership’s scrutiny or protocols.”

Relevant numbers:

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVLA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 507 7920
Car Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 2173
Driving Licence (general) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8928
Driving Test Booking (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8930
VOSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7344
DVSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
Road Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2576
Personalised Registration Plates (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8922
Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0226
Provisional Licence (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8927
Theory Test (bookings) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8924
Medical Issues (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7271
V5C and Log Books (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075
Driver Check Service (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075

About DVLA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA; Welsh: Asiantaeth Trwyddedu Gyrwyr a Cherbydau) is the organisation of the UK government responsible for maintaining a database of drivers in Great Britain and a database of vehicles for the entire United Kingdom. Its counterpart for drivers in Northern Ireland is the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA). The agency issues driving licences, organises collection of vehicle excise duty (also known as road tax and road fund licence) and sells personalised registrations.

The DVLA is an executive agency of the Department for Transport (DfT). The current Chief Executive of the agency is Oliver Morley.[1]

The DVLA is based in Swansea, Wales, with a prominent 16-storey building in Clase and offices in Swansea Vale. It was previously known as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC). The agency previously had a network of 39 offices around Great Britain, known as the Local Office Network, where users could attend to apply for licences and transact other business, but in the early 21st century the local offices were completely closed by December 2013. The agency’s work is consequently fully centralised in Swansea, with the majority of users having to transact remotely – by post or (for some transactions) by phone.[2]

DVLA introduced Electronic Vehicle Licensing (EVL) in 2004, allowing customers to pay vehicle excise duty online and by telephone.[3] However, customers still have the option to tax their vehicles via the Post Office. A seven-year contract enabling the Post Office to continue to process car tax applications was agreed in November 2012, with the option of a three-year extension.[4]

Originally, vehicle registration was the responsibility of Borough and County councils throughout Great Britain, a system created by the Motor Car Act 1903. The licensing system was centralised in 1965 and administered from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC) in Swansea. In 1990, the DVLC was renamed as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA), becoming an executive agency of Department for Transport.[5]

British Forces Germany civilian vehicles[edit]
Civilian vehicles used in Germany by members of British Forces Germany or their families are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Ministry of Defence.

Diplomatic and consular vehicles[edit]
Official diplomatic and consular vehicles are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

DVLA database[edit]

Pre-2012 logo of DVLA
The vehicle register held by DVLA is used in many ways. For example, by the DVLA itself to identify untaxed vehicles, and by outside agencies to identify keepers of cars entering central London who have not paid the congestion charge, or who exceed speed limits on a road that has speed cameras by matching the cars to their keepers utilising the DVLA database. The current DVLA vehicle register was built by EDS under a £5 million contract signed in 1996, with a planned implementation date on October 1998, though actual implementation was delayed by a year. It uses a client�”server architecture and uses the vehicle identification number, rather than the registration plate, as the primary key to track vehicles, eliminating the possibility of having multiple registrations for a single vehicle.

The Vehicle Identity Check (VIC) was introduced to help reduce vehicle crime. It is intended to deter criminals from disguising stolen cars with the identity of written off or scrapped vehicles however this scheme was later scrapped in October 2014.

When an insurance company writes off a car, the registration document (V5 logbook) is surrendered to them and destroyed. The insurance company will then notify the DVLA that the vehicle has been written off. This notification will set a “VIC marker” on the vehicle record on the DVLA database.

DVLA database records are used by commercial vehicle check companies to offer a comprehensive individual car check to prospective purchasers.

However, the accuracy of the data held remains a continuing problem.[citation needed] Anyone can request information from the database if they purport to have just cause to need it, for a fee of £2.50.[6]

The database of drivers, developed in the late 1980s, holds details of some 42 million driving licence holders in the UK. It is used to produce driving licences and to assist bodies such as the Driving Standards Agency, police and courts in the enforcement of legislation concerning driving entitlements and road safety.

The DVLA revealed in December 2012 that it had temporarily banned 294 public bodies, including local councils and police forces, for not using their access to the database correctly between 2006 and 2012. A further 38 bodies were banned permanently during the period.[7]

Financial information[edit]
Between 2002 and 2015 it is estimated that the DVLA will spend £500 million on information technology from IBM.[8]

Employment[edit]
Staff of the DVLA are predominantly female whereas other parts of the Department for Transport are predominantly male. Starting salaries are just over £12,500.[9] In November 2007, a Public Accounts Committee report criticised the “amazingly high” levels of sick leave among staff at the DVLA, where employees took an average of three weeks per year of sick leave. The report said that overall sickness leave at the DfT and its seven agencies averaged 10.4 working days per full-time employee in 2005, which they calculated as costing taxpayers £24 million. While sick leave rates at the department itself and four of its agencies were below average�”at the DVLA and DSA, which together employ more than 50% of all DfT staff�”they were “significantly higher”. Committee chairman Edward Leigh said it was surprising the agencies could “function adequately”.[10] In 2008 DVLA staff went on a one-day strike over pay inequality arguing that they should receive similar salaries to other employees of the Department for Transport.[9] The most recent level of sickness absence for 2012/13 was 6.7 days.[11]

Advertising[edit]
The DVLA uses advertising to warn drivers that if they do not pay their road tax, their cars may be crushed.[12]

Controversies[edit]
Missing documents[edit]
In 2006, 120,000 to 130,000 vehicle registration certificates went missing. A BBC investigation in 2010 found that vehicles worth £13 million had been stolen using the documents in the 18 months preceding the investigation. Around ten cars are found each week to have forged log books and police said it would be decades before they were all recovered.[13]

DVLA letter bombs[edit]
Main article: 2007 United Kingdom letter bombs
On 7 February 2007, a letter bomb was sent to the DVLA in Swansea and injured four people. It is suspected that this is part of a group of letter bombs sent to other organisations that deal with the administration of motoring charges and offences, such as Capita in central London, which was targeted a few days earlier. Miles Cooper, aged 27, a school caretaker, was arrested on 19 February 2007, and charged on 22 February. The DVLA have since installed X-Ray machines in all post opening areas to reduce the effectiveness of any further attacks.

Wrong confidential records on surveys[edit]
In December 2007, it was revealed that while sending out surveys to 1,215 drivers, the DVLA sent out confidential details, but to the wrong owners. The error occurred during the sending out of routine surveys, and was not discovered until members of the public contacted the DVLA to notify them of the error.[14]

Lost entitlements[edit]
In 2009 BBC’s Watchdog reported that entitlements, specifically the entitlement to drive a motorcycle, were being lost from reissued driving licences.[15] In 2005 the same programme highlighted drivers who had lost entitlements to drive heavy goods vehicles in a similar way.

Sale of details[edit]
In 2010 it was revealed that the DVLA had sold drivers’ details from the database to certain private parking enforcement companies run by individuals with criminal records. The DVLA sells details to companies for £2.50, but it was found that the agency had sold some of these to a business which had been fined weeks before for unfair business practices.[16]

Mobile Speed Camera Location, A580 East Lancs Rd from jct with Newton Rd for approx. 1km W (Eastbound)

Address:
A580 East Lancs Rd from jct with Newton Rd for approx. 1km W (Eastbound)


Taken from
“This list is an indication of where the community concern mobile enforcement vehicle may park. It is not necessarily the exact location. Enforcement can take place anywhere within a buffer.
The Police have discretion to undertake speed enforcement anywhere within the Greater Manchester area, activity which is separate to and not funded by or through the Partnership, and not subject to the Partnership’s scrutiny or protocols.”

Relevant numbers:

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVLA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 507 7920
Car Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 2173
Driving Licence (general) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8928
Driving Test Booking (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8930
VOSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7344
DVSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
Road Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2576
Personalised Registration Plates (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8922
Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0226
Provisional Licence (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8927
Theory Test (bookings) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8924
Medical Issues (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7271
V5C and Log Books (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075
Driver Check Service (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075

About DVLA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA; Welsh: Asiantaeth Trwyddedu Gyrwyr a Cherbydau) is the organisation of the UK government responsible for maintaining a database of drivers in Great Britain and a database of vehicles for the entire United Kingdom. Its counterpart for drivers in Northern Ireland is the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA). The agency issues driving licences, organises collection of vehicle excise duty (also known as road tax and road fund licence) and sells personalised registrations.

The DVLA is an executive agency of the Department for Transport (DfT). The current Chief Executive of the agency is Oliver Morley.[1]

The DVLA is based in Swansea, Wales, with a prominent 16-storey building in Clase and offices in Swansea Vale. It was previously known as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC). The agency previously had a network of 39 offices around Great Britain, known as the Local Office Network, where users could attend to apply for licences and transact other business, but in the early 21st century the local offices were completely closed by December 2013. The agency’s work is consequently fully centralised in Swansea, with the majority of users having to transact remotely – by post or (for some transactions) by phone.[2]

DVLA introduced Electronic Vehicle Licensing (EVL) in 2004, allowing customers to pay vehicle excise duty online and by telephone.[3] However, customers still have the option to tax their vehicles via the Post Office. A seven-year contract enabling the Post Office to continue to process car tax applications was agreed in November 2012, with the option of a three-year extension.[4]

Originally, vehicle registration was the responsibility of Borough and County councils throughout Great Britain, a system created by the Motor Car Act 1903. The licensing system was centralised in 1965 and administered from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC) in Swansea. In 1990, the DVLC was renamed as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA), becoming an executive agency of Department for Transport.[5]

British Forces Germany civilian vehicles[edit]
Civilian vehicles used in Germany by members of British Forces Germany or their families are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Ministry of Defence.

Diplomatic and consular vehicles[edit]
Official diplomatic and consular vehicles are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

DVLA database[edit]

Pre-2012 logo of DVLA
The vehicle register held by DVLA is used in many ways. For example, by the DVLA itself to identify untaxed vehicles, and by outside agencies to identify keepers of cars entering central London who have not paid the congestion charge, or who exceed speed limits on a road that has speed cameras by matching the cars to their keepers utilising the DVLA database. The current DVLA vehicle register was built by EDS under a £5 million contract signed in 1996, with a planned implementation date on October 1998, though actual implementation was delayed by a year. It uses a client�”server architecture and uses the vehicle identification number, rather than the registration plate, as the primary key to track vehicles, eliminating the possibility of having multiple registrations for a single vehicle.

The Vehicle Identity Check (VIC) was introduced to help reduce vehicle crime. It is intended to deter criminals from disguising stolen cars with the identity of written off or scrapped vehicles however this scheme was later scrapped in October 2014.

When an insurance company writes off a car, the registration document (V5 logbook) is surrendered to them and destroyed. The insurance company will then notify the DVLA that the vehicle has been written off. This notification will set a “VIC marker” on the vehicle record on the DVLA database.

DVLA database records are used by commercial vehicle check companies to offer a comprehensive individual car check to prospective purchasers.

However, the accuracy of the data held remains a continuing problem.[citation needed] Anyone can request information from the database if they purport to have just cause to need it, for a fee of £2.50.[6]

The database of drivers, developed in the late 1980s, holds details of some 42 million driving licence holders in the UK. It is used to produce driving licences and to assist bodies such as the Driving Standards Agency, police and courts in the enforcement of legislation concerning driving entitlements and road safety.

The DVLA revealed in December 2012 that it had temporarily banned 294 public bodies, including local councils and police forces, for not using their access to the database correctly between 2006 and 2012. A further 38 bodies were banned permanently during the period.[7]

Financial information[edit]
Between 2002 and 2015 it is estimated that the DVLA will spend £500 million on information technology from IBM.[8]

Employment[edit]
Staff of the DVLA are predominantly female whereas other parts of the Department for Transport are predominantly male. Starting salaries are just over £12,500.[9] In November 2007, a Public Accounts Committee report criticised the “amazingly high” levels of sick leave among staff at the DVLA, where employees took an average of three weeks per year of sick leave. The report said that overall sickness leave at the DfT and its seven agencies averaged 10.4 working days per full-time employee in 2005, which they calculated as costing taxpayers £24 million. While sick leave rates at the department itself and four of its agencies were below average�”at the DVLA and DSA, which together employ more than 50% of all DfT staff�”they were “significantly higher”. Committee chairman Edward Leigh said it was surprising the agencies could “function adequately”.[10] In 2008 DVLA staff went on a one-day strike over pay inequality arguing that they should receive similar salaries to other employees of the Department for Transport.[9] The most recent level of sickness absence for 2012/13 was 6.7 days.[11]

Advertising[edit]
The DVLA uses advertising to warn drivers that if they do not pay their road tax, their cars may be crushed.[12]

Controversies[edit]
Missing documents[edit]
In 2006, 120,000 to 130,000 vehicle registration certificates went missing. A BBC investigation in 2010 found that vehicles worth £13 million had been stolen using the documents in the 18 months preceding the investigation. Around ten cars are found each week to have forged log books and police said it would be decades before they were all recovered.[13]

DVLA letter bombs[edit]
Main article: 2007 United Kingdom letter bombs
On 7 February 2007, a letter bomb was sent to the DVLA in Swansea and injured four people. It is suspected that this is part of a group of letter bombs sent to other organisations that deal with the administration of motoring charges and offences, such as Capita in central London, which was targeted a few days earlier. Miles Cooper, aged 27, a school caretaker, was arrested on 19 February 2007, and charged on 22 February. The DVLA have since installed X-Ray machines in all post opening areas to reduce the effectiveness of any further attacks.

Wrong confidential records on surveys[edit]
In December 2007, it was revealed that while sending out surveys to 1,215 drivers, the DVLA sent out confidential details, but to the wrong owners. The error occurred during the sending out of routine surveys, and was not discovered until members of the public contacted the DVLA to notify them of the error.[14]

Lost entitlements[edit]
In 2009 BBC’s Watchdog reported that entitlements, specifically the entitlement to drive a motorcycle, were being lost from reissued driving licences.[15] In 2005 the same programme highlighted drivers who had lost entitlements to drive heavy goods vehicles in a similar way.

Sale of details[edit]
In 2010 it was revealed that the DVLA had sold drivers’ details from the database to certain private parking enforcement companies run by individuals with criminal records. The DVLA sells details to companies for £2.50, but it was found that the agency had sold some of these to a business which had been fined weeks before for unfair business practices.[16]

Mobile Speed Camera Location, A580 East Lancs Rd from jct with Chaddock Ln to approx. 1km SW (Eastbound)

Address:
A580 East Lancs Rd from jct with Chaddock Ln to approx. 1km SW (Eastbound)


Taken from
“This list is an indication of where the community concern mobile enforcement vehicle may park. It is not necessarily the exact location. Enforcement can take place anywhere within a buffer.
The Police have discretion to undertake speed enforcement anywhere within the Greater Manchester area, activity which is separate to and not funded by or through the Partnership, and not subject to the Partnership’s scrutiny or protocols.”

Relevant numbers:

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVLA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 507 7920
Car Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 2173
Driving Licence (general) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8928
Driving Test Booking (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8930
VOSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7344
DVSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
Road Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2576
Personalised Registration Plates (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8922
Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0226
Provisional Licence (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8927
Theory Test (bookings) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8924
Medical Issues (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7271
V5C and Log Books (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075
Driver Check Service (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075

About DVLA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA; Welsh: Asiantaeth Trwyddedu Gyrwyr a Cherbydau) is the organisation of the UK government responsible for maintaining a database of drivers in Great Britain and a database of vehicles for the entire United Kingdom. Its counterpart for drivers in Northern Ireland is the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA). The agency issues driving licences, organises collection of vehicle excise duty (also known as road tax and road fund licence) and sells personalised registrations.

The DVLA is an executive agency of the Department for Transport (DfT). The current Chief Executive of the agency is Oliver Morley.[1]

The DVLA is based in Swansea, Wales, with a prominent 16-storey building in Clase and offices in Swansea Vale. It was previously known as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC). The agency previously had a network of 39 offices around Great Britain, known as the Local Office Network, where users could attend to apply for licences and transact other business, but in the early 21st century the local offices were completely closed by December 2013. The agency’s work is consequently fully centralised in Swansea, with the majority of users having to transact remotely – by post or (for some transactions) by phone.[2]

DVLA introduced Electronic Vehicle Licensing (EVL) in 2004, allowing customers to pay vehicle excise duty online and by telephone.[3] However, customers still have the option to tax their vehicles via the Post Office. A seven-year contract enabling the Post Office to continue to process car tax applications was agreed in November 2012, with the option of a three-year extension.[4]

Originally, vehicle registration was the responsibility of Borough and County councils throughout Great Britain, a system created by the Motor Car Act 1903. The licensing system was centralised in 1965 and administered from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC) in Swansea. In 1990, the DVLC was renamed as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA), becoming an executive agency of Department for Transport.[5]

British Forces Germany civilian vehicles[edit]
Civilian vehicles used in Germany by members of British Forces Germany or their families are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Ministry of Defence.

Diplomatic and consular vehicles[edit]
Official diplomatic and consular vehicles are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

DVLA database[edit]

Pre-2012 logo of DVLA
The vehicle register held by DVLA is used in many ways. For example, by the DVLA itself to identify untaxed vehicles, and by outside agencies to identify keepers of cars entering central London who have not paid the congestion charge, or who exceed speed limits on a road that has speed cameras by matching the cars to their keepers utilising the DVLA database. The current DVLA vehicle register was built by EDS under a £5 million contract signed in 1996, with a planned implementation date on October 1998, though actual implementation was delayed by a year. It uses a client�”server architecture and uses the vehicle identification number, rather than the registration plate, as the primary key to track vehicles, eliminating the possibility of having multiple registrations for a single vehicle.

The Vehicle Identity Check (VIC) was introduced to help reduce vehicle crime. It is intended to deter criminals from disguising stolen cars with the identity of written off or scrapped vehicles however this scheme was later scrapped in October 2014.

When an insurance company writes off a car, the registration document (V5 logbook) is surrendered to them and destroyed. The insurance company will then notify the DVLA that the vehicle has been written off. This notification will set a “VIC marker” on the vehicle record on the DVLA database.

DVLA database records are used by commercial vehicle check companies to offer a comprehensive individual car check to prospective purchasers.

However, the accuracy of the data held remains a continuing problem.[citation needed] Anyone can request information from the database if they purport to have just cause to need it, for a fee of £2.50.[6]

The database of drivers, developed in the late 1980s, holds details of some 42 million driving licence holders in the UK. It is used to produce driving licences and to assist bodies such as the Driving Standards Agency, police and courts in the enforcement of legislation concerning driving entitlements and road safety.

The DVLA revealed in December 2012 that it had temporarily banned 294 public bodies, including local councils and police forces, for not using their access to the database correctly between 2006 and 2012. A further 38 bodies were banned permanently during the period.[7]

Financial information[edit]
Between 2002 and 2015 it is estimated that the DVLA will spend £500 million on information technology from IBM.[8]

Employment[edit]
Staff of the DVLA are predominantly female whereas other parts of the Department for Transport are predominantly male. Starting salaries are just over £12,500.[9] In November 2007, a Public Accounts Committee report criticised the “amazingly high” levels of sick leave among staff at the DVLA, where employees took an average of three weeks per year of sick leave. The report said that overall sickness leave at the DfT and its seven agencies averaged 10.4 working days per full-time employee in 2005, which they calculated as costing taxpayers £24 million. While sick leave rates at the department itself and four of its agencies were below average�”at the DVLA and DSA, which together employ more than 50% of all DfT staff�”they were “significantly higher”. Committee chairman Edward Leigh said it was surprising the agencies could “function adequately”.[10] In 2008 DVLA staff went on a one-day strike over pay inequality arguing that they should receive similar salaries to other employees of the Department for Transport.[9] The most recent level of sickness absence for 2012/13 was 6.7 days.[11]

Advertising[edit]
The DVLA uses advertising to warn drivers that if they do not pay their road tax, their cars may be crushed.[12]

Controversies[edit]
Missing documents[edit]
In 2006, 120,000 to 130,000 vehicle registration certificates went missing. A BBC investigation in 2010 found that vehicles worth £13 million had been stolen using the documents in the 18 months preceding the investigation. Around ten cars are found each week to have forged log books and police said it would be decades before they were all recovered.[13]

DVLA letter bombs[edit]
Main article: 2007 United Kingdom letter bombs
On 7 February 2007, a letter bomb was sent to the DVLA in Swansea and injured four people. It is suspected that this is part of a group of letter bombs sent to other organisations that deal with the administration of motoring charges and offences, such as Capita in central London, which was targeted a few days earlier. Miles Cooper, aged 27, a school caretaker, was arrested on 19 February 2007, and charged on 22 February. The DVLA have since installed X-Ray machines in all post opening areas to reduce the effectiveness of any further attacks.

Wrong confidential records on surveys[edit]
In December 2007, it was revealed that while sending out surveys to 1,215 drivers, the DVLA sent out confidential details, but to the wrong owners. The error occurred during the sending out of routine surveys, and was not discovered until members of the public contacted the DVLA to notify them of the error.[14]

Lost entitlements[edit]
In 2009 BBC’s Watchdog reported that entitlements, specifically the entitlement to drive a motorcycle, were being lost from reissued driving licences.[15] In 2005 the same programme highlighted drivers who had lost entitlements to drive heavy goods vehicles in a similar way.

Sale of details[edit]
In 2010 it was revealed that the DVLA had sold drivers’ details from the database to certain private parking enforcement companies run by individuals with criminal records. The DVLA sells details to companies for £2.50, but it was found that the agency had sold some of these to a business which had been fined weeks before for unfair business practices.[16]

Mobile Speed Camera Location, A580 East Lancs Rd from near jct with Stone Cross Ln North for approx. 1km E (Westbound)

Address:
A580 East Lancs Rd from near jct with Stone Cross Ln North for approx. 1km E (Westbound)


Taken from
“This list is an indication of where the community concern mobile enforcement vehicle may park. It is not necessarily the exact location. Enforcement can take place anywhere within a buffer.
The Police have discretion to undertake speed enforcement anywhere within the Greater Manchester area, activity which is separate to and not funded by or through the Partnership, and not subject to the Partnership’s scrutiny or protocols.”

Relevant numbers:

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVLA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 507 7920
Car Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 2173
Driving Licence (general) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8928
Driving Test Booking (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8930
VOSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7344
DVSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
Road Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2576
Personalised Registration Plates (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8922
Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0226
Provisional Licence (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8927
Theory Test (bookings) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8924
Medical Issues (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7271
V5C and Log Books (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075
Driver Check Service (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075

About DVLA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA; Welsh: Asiantaeth Trwyddedu Gyrwyr a Cherbydau) is the organisation of the UK government responsible for maintaining a database of drivers in Great Britain and a database of vehicles for the entire United Kingdom. Its counterpart for drivers in Northern Ireland is the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA). The agency issues driving licences, organises collection of vehicle excise duty (also known as road tax and road fund licence) and sells personalised registrations.

The DVLA is an executive agency of the Department for Transport (DfT). The current Chief Executive of the agency is Oliver Morley.[1]

The DVLA is based in Swansea, Wales, with a prominent 16-storey building in Clase and offices in Swansea Vale. It was previously known as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC). The agency previously had a network of 39 offices around Great Britain, known as the Local Office Network, where users could attend to apply for licences and transact other business, but in the early 21st century the local offices were completely closed by December 2013. The agency’s work is consequently fully centralised in Swansea, with the majority of users having to transact remotely – by post or (for some transactions) by phone.[2]

DVLA introduced Electronic Vehicle Licensing (EVL) in 2004, allowing customers to pay vehicle excise duty online and by telephone.[3] However, customers still have the option to tax their vehicles via the Post Office. A seven-year contract enabling the Post Office to continue to process car tax applications was agreed in November 2012, with the option of a three-year extension.[4]

Originally, vehicle registration was the responsibility of Borough and County councils throughout Great Britain, a system created by the Motor Car Act 1903. The licensing system was centralised in 1965 and administered from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC) in Swansea. In 1990, the DVLC was renamed as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA), becoming an executive agency of Department for Transport.[5]

British Forces Germany civilian vehicles[edit]
Civilian vehicles used in Germany by members of British Forces Germany or their families are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Ministry of Defence.

Diplomatic and consular vehicles[edit]
Official diplomatic and consular vehicles are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

DVLA database[edit]

Pre-2012 logo of DVLA
The vehicle register held by DVLA is used in many ways. For example, by the DVLA itself to identify untaxed vehicles, and by outside agencies to identify keepers of cars entering central London who have not paid the congestion charge, or who exceed speed limits on a road that has speed cameras by matching the cars to their keepers utilising the DVLA database. The current DVLA vehicle register was built by EDS under a £5 million contract signed in 1996, with a planned implementation date on October 1998, though actual implementation was delayed by a year. It uses a client�”server architecture and uses the vehicle identification number, rather than the registration plate, as the primary key to track vehicles, eliminating the possibility of having multiple registrations for a single vehicle.

The Vehicle Identity Check (VIC) was introduced to help reduce vehicle crime. It is intended to deter criminals from disguising stolen cars with the identity of written off or scrapped vehicles however this scheme was later scrapped in October 2014.

When an insurance company writes off a car, the registration document (V5 logbook) is surrendered to them and destroyed. The insurance company will then notify the DVLA that the vehicle has been written off. This notification will set a “VIC marker” on the vehicle record on the DVLA database.

DVLA database records are used by commercial vehicle check companies to offer a comprehensive individual car check to prospective purchasers.

However, the accuracy of the data held remains a continuing problem.[citation needed] Anyone can request information from the database if they purport to have just cause to need it, for a fee of £2.50.[6]

The database of drivers, developed in the late 1980s, holds details of some 42 million driving licence holders in the UK. It is used to produce driving licences and to assist bodies such as the Driving Standards Agency, police and courts in the enforcement of legislation concerning driving entitlements and road safety.

The DVLA revealed in December 2012 that it had temporarily banned 294 public bodies, including local councils and police forces, for not using their access to the database correctly between 2006 and 2012. A further 38 bodies were banned permanently during the period.[7]

Financial information[edit]
Between 2002 and 2015 it is estimated that the DVLA will spend £500 million on information technology from IBM.[8]

Employment[edit]
Staff of the DVLA are predominantly female whereas other parts of the Department for Transport are predominantly male. Starting salaries are just over £12,500.[9] In November 2007, a Public Accounts Committee report criticised the “amazingly high” levels of sick leave among staff at the DVLA, where employees took an average of three weeks per year of sick leave. The report said that overall sickness leave at the DfT and its seven agencies averaged 10.4 working days per full-time employee in 2005, which they calculated as costing taxpayers £24 million. While sick leave rates at the department itself and four of its agencies were below average�”at the DVLA and DSA, which together employ more than 50% of all DfT staff�”they were “significantly higher”. Committee chairman Edward Leigh said it was surprising the agencies could “function adequately”.[10] In 2008 DVLA staff went on a one-day strike over pay inequality arguing that they should receive similar salaries to other employees of the Department for Transport.[9] The most recent level of sickness absence for 2012/13 was 6.7 days.[11]

Advertising[edit]
The DVLA uses advertising to warn drivers that if they do not pay their road tax, their cars may be crushed.[12]

Controversies[edit]
Missing documents[edit]
In 2006, 120,000 to 130,000 vehicle registration certificates went missing. A BBC investigation in 2010 found that vehicles worth £13 million had been stolen using the documents in the 18 months preceding the investigation. Around ten cars are found each week to have forged log books and police said it would be decades before they were all recovered.[13]

DVLA letter bombs[edit]
Main article: 2007 United Kingdom letter bombs
On 7 February 2007, a letter bomb was sent to the DVLA in Swansea and injured four people. It is suspected that this is part of a group of letter bombs sent to other organisations that deal with the administration of motoring charges and offences, such as Capita in central London, which was targeted a few days earlier. Miles Cooper, aged 27, a school caretaker, was arrested on 19 February 2007, and charged on 22 February. The DVLA have since installed X-Ray machines in all post opening areas to reduce the effectiveness of any further attacks.

Wrong confidential records on surveys[edit]
In December 2007, it was revealed that while sending out surveys to 1,215 drivers, the DVLA sent out confidential details, but to the wrong owners. The error occurred during the sending out of routine surveys, and was not discovered until members of the public contacted the DVLA to notify them of the error.[14]

Lost entitlements[edit]
In 2009 BBC’s Watchdog reported that entitlements, specifically the entitlement to drive a motorcycle, were being lost from reissued driving licences.[15] In 2005 the same programme highlighted drivers who had lost entitlements to drive heavy goods vehicles in a similar way.

Sale of details[edit]
In 2010 it was revealed that the DVLA had sold drivers’ details from the database to certain private parking enforcement companies run by individuals with criminal records. The DVLA sells details to companies for £2.50, but it was found that the agency had sold some of these to a business which had been fined weeks before for unfair business practices.[16]

Mobile Speed Camera Location, A580 East Lancs Rd from near jct with Higher Green Ln to near jct with Chaddock Ln (Westbound)

Address:
A580 East Lancs Rd from near jct with Higher Green Ln to near jct with Chaddock Ln (Westbound)


Taken from
“This list is an indication of where the community concern mobile enforcement vehicle may park. It is not necessarily the exact location. Enforcement can take place anywhere within a buffer.
The Police have discretion to undertake speed enforcement anywhere within the Greater Manchester area, activity which is separate to and not funded by or through the Partnership, and not subject to the Partnership’s scrutiny or protocols.”

Relevant numbers:

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVLA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 507 7920
Car Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 2173
Driving Licence (general) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8928
Driving Test Booking (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8930
VOSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7344
DVSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
Road Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2576
Personalised Registration Plates (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8922
Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0226
Provisional Licence (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8927
Theory Test (bookings) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8924
Medical Issues (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7271
V5C and Log Books (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075
Driver Check Service (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075

About DVLA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA; Welsh: Asiantaeth Trwyddedu Gyrwyr a Cherbydau) is the organisation of the UK government responsible for maintaining a database of drivers in Great Britain and a database of vehicles for the entire United Kingdom. Its counterpart for drivers in Northern Ireland is the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA). The agency issues driving licences, organises collection of vehicle excise duty (also known as road tax and road fund licence) and sells personalised registrations.

The DVLA is an executive agency of the Department for Transport (DfT). The current Chief Executive of the agency is Oliver Morley.[1]

The DVLA is based in Swansea, Wales, with a prominent 16-storey building in Clase and offices in Swansea Vale. It was previously known as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC). The agency previously had a network of 39 offices around Great Britain, known as the Local Office Network, where users could attend to apply for licences and transact other business, but in the early 21st century the local offices were completely closed by December 2013. The agency’s work is consequently fully centralised in Swansea, with the majority of users having to transact remotely – by post or (for some transactions) by phone.[2]

DVLA introduced Electronic Vehicle Licensing (EVL) in 2004, allowing customers to pay vehicle excise duty online and by telephone.[3] However, customers still have the option to tax their vehicles via the Post Office. A seven-year contract enabling the Post Office to continue to process car tax applications was agreed in November 2012, with the option of a three-year extension.[4]

Originally, vehicle registration was the responsibility of Borough and County councils throughout Great Britain, a system created by the Motor Car Act 1903. The licensing system was centralised in 1965 and administered from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC) in Swansea. In 1990, the DVLC was renamed as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA), becoming an executive agency of Department for Transport.[5]

British Forces Germany civilian vehicles[edit]
Civilian vehicles used in Germany by members of British Forces Germany or their families are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Ministry of Defence.

Diplomatic and consular vehicles[edit]
Official diplomatic and consular vehicles are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

DVLA database[edit]

Pre-2012 logo of DVLA
The vehicle register held by DVLA is used in many ways. For example, by the DVLA itself to identify untaxed vehicles, and by outside agencies to identify keepers of cars entering central London who have not paid the congestion charge, or who exceed speed limits on a road that has speed cameras by matching the cars to their keepers utilising the DVLA database. The current DVLA vehicle register was built by EDS under a £5 million contract signed in 1996, with a planned implementation date on October 1998, though actual implementation was delayed by a year. It uses a client�”server architecture and uses the vehicle identification number, rather than the registration plate, as the primary key to track vehicles, eliminating the possibility of having multiple registrations for a single vehicle.

The Vehicle Identity Check (VIC) was introduced to help reduce vehicle crime. It is intended to deter criminals from disguising stolen cars with the identity of written off or scrapped vehicles however this scheme was later scrapped in October 2014.

When an insurance company writes off a car, the registration document (V5 logbook) is surrendered to them and destroyed. The insurance company will then notify the DVLA that the vehicle has been written off. This notification will set a “VIC marker” on the vehicle record on the DVLA database.

DVLA database records are used by commercial vehicle check companies to offer a comprehensive individual car check to prospective purchasers.

However, the accuracy of the data held remains a continuing problem.[citation needed] Anyone can request information from the database if they purport to have just cause to need it, for a fee of £2.50.[6]

The database of drivers, developed in the late 1980s, holds details of some 42 million driving licence holders in the UK. It is used to produce driving licences and to assist bodies such as the Driving Standards Agency, police and courts in the enforcement of legislation concerning driving entitlements and road safety.

The DVLA revealed in December 2012 that it had temporarily banned 294 public bodies, including local councils and police forces, for not using their access to the database correctly between 2006 and 2012. A further 38 bodies were banned permanently during the period.[7]

Financial information[edit]
Between 2002 and 2015 it is estimated that the DVLA will spend £500 million on information technology from IBM.[8]

Employment[edit]
Staff of the DVLA are predominantly female whereas other parts of the Department for Transport are predominantly male. Starting salaries are just over £12,500.[9] In November 2007, a Public Accounts Committee report criticised the “amazingly high” levels of sick leave among staff at the DVLA, where employees took an average of three weeks per year of sick leave. The report said that overall sickness leave at the DfT and its seven agencies averaged 10.4 working days per full-time employee in 2005, which they calculated as costing taxpayers £24 million. While sick leave rates at the department itself and four of its agencies were below average�”at the DVLA and DSA, which together employ more than 50% of all DfT staff�”they were “significantly higher”. Committee chairman Edward Leigh said it was surprising the agencies could “function adequately”.[10] In 2008 DVLA staff went on a one-day strike over pay inequality arguing that they should receive similar salaries to other employees of the Department for Transport.[9] The most recent level of sickness absence for 2012/13 was 6.7 days.[11]

Advertising[edit]
The DVLA uses advertising to warn drivers that if they do not pay their road tax, their cars may be crushed.[12]

Controversies[edit]
Missing documents[edit]
In 2006, 120,000 to 130,000 vehicle registration certificates went missing. A BBC investigation in 2010 found that vehicles worth £13 million had been stolen using the documents in the 18 months preceding the investigation. Around ten cars are found each week to have forged log books and police said it would be decades before they were all recovered.[13]

DVLA letter bombs[edit]
Main article: 2007 United Kingdom letter bombs
On 7 February 2007, a letter bomb was sent to the DVLA in Swansea and injured four people. It is suspected that this is part of a group of letter bombs sent to other organisations that deal with the administration of motoring charges and offences, such as Capita in central London, which was targeted a few days earlier. Miles Cooper, aged 27, a school caretaker, was arrested on 19 February 2007, and charged on 22 February. The DVLA have since installed X-Ray machines in all post opening areas to reduce the effectiveness of any further attacks.

Wrong confidential records on surveys[edit]
In December 2007, it was revealed that while sending out surveys to 1,215 drivers, the DVLA sent out confidential details, but to the wrong owners. The error occurred during the sending out of routine surveys, and was not discovered until members of the public contacted the DVLA to notify them of the error.[14]

Lost entitlements[edit]
In 2009 BBC’s Watchdog reported that entitlements, specifically the entitlement to drive a motorcycle, were being lost from reissued driving licences.[15] In 2005 the same programme highlighted drivers who had lost entitlements to drive heavy goods vehicles in a similar way.

Sale of details[edit]
In 2010 it was revealed that the DVLA had sold drivers’ details from the database to certain private parking enforcement companies run by individuals with criminal records. The DVLA sells details to companies for £2.50, but it was found that the agency had sold some of these to a business which had been fined weeks before for unfair business practices.[16]

Mobile Speed Camera Location, A580 East Lancs Rd from approx. 410m SW of jct with Higher Green Ln for approx. 1km SW (Eastbound)

Address:
A580 East Lancs Rd from approx. 410m SW of jct with Higher Green Ln for approx. 1km SW (Eastbound)


Taken from
“This list is an indication of where the community concern mobile enforcement vehicle may park. It is not necessarily the exact location. Enforcement can take place anywhere within a buffer.
The Police have discretion to undertake speed enforcement anywhere within the Greater Manchester area, activity which is separate to and not funded by or through the Partnership, and not subject to the Partnership’s scrutiny or protocols.”

Relevant numbers:

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVLA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 507 7920
Car Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 2173
Driving Licence (general) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8928
Driving Test Booking (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8930
VOSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7344
DVSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
Road Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2576
Personalised Registration Plates (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8922
Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0226
Provisional Licence (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8927
Theory Test (bookings) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8924
Medical Issues (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7271
V5C and Log Books (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075
Driver Check Service (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075

About DVLA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA; Welsh: Asiantaeth Trwyddedu Gyrwyr a Cherbydau) is the organisation of the UK government responsible for maintaining a database of drivers in Great Britain and a database of vehicles for the entire United Kingdom. Its counterpart for drivers in Northern Ireland is the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA). The agency issues driving licences, organises collection of vehicle excise duty (also known as road tax and road fund licence) and sells personalised registrations.

The DVLA is an executive agency of the Department for Transport (DfT). The current Chief Executive of the agency is Oliver Morley.[1]

The DVLA is based in Swansea, Wales, with a prominent 16-storey building in Clase and offices in Swansea Vale. It was previously known as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC). The agency previously had a network of 39 offices around Great Britain, known as the Local Office Network, where users could attend to apply for licences and transact other business, but in the early 21st century the local offices were completely closed by December 2013. The agency’s work is consequently fully centralised in Swansea, with the majority of users having to transact remotely – by post or (for some transactions) by phone.[2]

DVLA introduced Electronic Vehicle Licensing (EVL) in 2004, allowing customers to pay vehicle excise duty online and by telephone.[3] However, customers still have the option to tax their vehicles via the Post Office. A seven-year contract enabling the Post Office to continue to process car tax applications was agreed in November 2012, with the option of a three-year extension.[4]

Originally, vehicle registration was the responsibility of Borough and County councils throughout Great Britain, a system created by the Motor Car Act 1903. The licensing system was centralised in 1965 and administered from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Centre (DVLC) in Swansea. In 1990, the DVLC was renamed as the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA), becoming an executive agency of Department for Transport.[5]

British Forces Germany civilian vehicles[edit]
Civilian vehicles used in Germany by members of British Forces Germany or their families are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Ministry of Defence.

Diplomatic and consular vehicles[edit]
Official diplomatic and consular vehicles are registered with the DVLA on behalf of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

DVLA database[edit]

Pre-2012 logo of DVLA
The vehicle register held by DVLA is used in many ways. For example, by the DVLA itself to identify untaxed vehicles, and by outside agencies to identify keepers of cars entering central London who have not paid the congestion charge, or who exceed speed limits on a road that has speed cameras by matching the cars to their keepers utilising the DVLA database. The current DVLA vehicle register was built by EDS under a £5 million contract signed in 1996, with a planned implementation date on October 1998, though actual implementation was delayed by a year. It uses a client�”server architecture and uses the vehicle identification number, rather than the registration plate, as the primary key to track vehicles, eliminating the possibility of having multiple registrations for a single vehicle.

The Vehicle Identity Check (VIC) was introduced to help reduce vehicle crime. It is intended to deter criminals from disguising stolen cars with the identity of written off or scrapped vehicles however this scheme was later scrapped in October 2014.

When an insurance company writes off a car, the registration document (V5 logbook) is surrendered to them and destroyed. The insurance company will then notify the DVLA that the vehicle has been written off. This notification will set a “VIC marker” on the vehicle record on the DVLA database.

DVLA database records are used by commercial vehicle check companies to offer a comprehensive individual car check to prospective purchasers.

However, the accuracy of the data held remains a continuing problem.[citation needed] Anyone can request information from the database if they purport to have just cause to need it, for a fee of £2.50.[6]

The database of drivers, developed in the late 1980s, holds details of some 42 million driving licence holders in the UK. It is used to produce driving licences and to assist bodies such as the Driving Standards Agency, police and courts in the enforcement of legislation concerning driving entitlements and road safety.

The DVLA revealed in December 2012 that it had temporarily banned 294 public bodies, including local councils and police forces, for not using their access to the database correctly between 2006 and 2012. A further 38 bodies were banned permanently during the period.[7]

Financial information[edit]
Between 2002 and 2015 it is estimated that the DVLA will spend £500 million on information technology from IBM.[8]

Employment[edit]
Staff of the DVLA are predominantly female whereas other parts of the Department for Transport are predominantly male. Starting salaries are just over £12,500.[9] In November 2007, a Public Accounts Committee report criticised the “amazingly high” levels of sick leave among staff at the DVLA, where employees took an average of three weeks per year of sick leave. The report said that overall sickness leave at the DfT and its seven agencies averaged 10.4 working days per full-time employee in 2005, which they calculated as costing taxpayers £24 million. While sick leave rates at the department itself and four of its agencies were below average�”at the DVLA and DSA, which together employ more than 50% of all DfT staff�”they were “significantly higher”. Committee chairman Edward Leigh said it was surprising the agencies could “function adequately”.[10] In 2008 DVLA staff went on a one-day strike over pay inequality arguing that they should receive similar salaries to other employees of the Department for Transport.[9] The most recent level of sickness absence for 2012/13 was 6.7 days.[11]

Advertising[edit]
The DVLA uses advertising to warn drivers that if they do not pay their road tax, their cars may be crushed.[12]

Controversies[edit]
Missing documents[edit]
In 2006, 120,000 to 130,000 vehicle registration certificates went missing. A BBC investigation in 2010 found that vehicles worth £13 million had been stolen using the documents in the 18 months preceding the investigation. Around ten cars are found each week to have forged log books and police said it would be decades before they were all recovered.[13]

DVLA letter bombs[edit]
Main article: 2007 United Kingdom letter bombs
On 7 February 2007, a letter bomb was sent to the DVLA in Swansea and injured four people. It is suspected that this is part of a group of letter bombs sent to other organisations that deal with the administration of motoring charges and offences, such as Capita in central London, which was targeted a few days earlier. Miles Cooper, aged 27, a school caretaker, was arrested on 19 February 2007, and charged on 22 February. The DVLA have since installed X-Ray machines in all post opening areas to reduce the effectiveness of any further attacks.

Wrong confidential records on surveys[edit]
In December 2007, it was revealed that while sending out surveys to 1,215 drivers, the DVLA sent out confidential details, but to the wrong owners. The error occurred during the sending out of routine surveys, and was not discovered until members of the public contacted the DVLA to notify them of the error.[14]

Lost entitlements[edit]
In 2009 BBC’s Watchdog reported that entitlements, specifically the entitlement to drive a motorcycle, were being lost from reissued driving licences.[15] In 2005 the same programme highlighted drivers who had lost entitlements to drive heavy goods vehicles in a similar way.

Sale of details[edit]
In 2010 it was revealed that the DVLA had sold drivers’ details from the database to certain private parking enforcement companies run by individuals with criminal records. The DVLA sells details to companies for £2.50, but it was found that the agency had sold some of these to a business which had been fined weeks before for unfair business practices.[16]