DVSA, Yeovil,Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency,Driving Test Centre Yeovil,Suite 2 Abbey Manor Business Ctr,”Preston Road, Yeovil”,,BA20 2EN

📞 We can forward your call to DVSA Now

Calls to 084 numbers cost 7ppm plus network charges. We are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned on this page. Looking for your local DVSA Driving Test Centre? Here’s everything you need to know:

Address:
DVSA Driving Test Centre, Yeovil,Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency,Driving Test Centre Yeovil,Suite 2 Abbey Manor Business Ctr,”Preston Road, Yeovil”,,BA20 2EN


Opening hours:
Most Driving test Centres are open from 8am to 7pm on weekdays, 8am – 2pm on Saturdays and are closed on Sundays. We have been unable to determine whether this is the case for this centre.

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVSA Driving Test Centre, Yeovil,Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency,Driving Test Centre Yeovil,Suite 2 Abbey Manor Business Ctr,”Preston Road, Yeovil”,,BA20 2EN (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
Driving Test Booking (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8930
VOSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7344
Car Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 2173
Driving Licence (general) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8928
DVLA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 507 7920
Road Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2576
Personalised Registration Plates (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8922
Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0226
Provisional Licence (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8927
Theory Test (bookings) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8924
Medical Issues (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7271
V5C and Log Books (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075
Driver Check Service (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075

About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About UK Driving Tests
from Wikipedia

The United Kingdom driving test is a test of competence that UK residents take in order to obtain a full Great Britain or Northern Ireland (car) driving licence or to add additional full entitlements to an existing one.[1] Tests vary depending on the class of vehicle to be driven. In Great Britain it is administered by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA)[2] and in Northern Ireland by the Driver & Vehicle Agency (DVA).[3]

The minimum age at which one can take a UK driving test is currently 16 for mopeds and 17 for cars (16 for those on the higher/enhanced rate of the mobility component of DLA or PIP[4]). There is no upper age limit. In addition to a driving licence, a CBT certificate may be required before a moped or motorcycle is ridden.[5]

In GB around 1.6 million people sit the practical car test per year, with a pass rate of around 43%.[6] The theory test has a pass rate of around 51.6%.[7]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 The current test
2.1 Theory test
2.1.1 Multiple-choice test
2.1.2 Hazard perception
2.2 Practical test
2.2.1 Format
2.2.2 Eyesight test
2.2.3 Vehicle safety questions
2.2.4 Controlled stop
2.2.5 Manoeuvres
2.2.6 General driving
2.2.7 Independent driving
3 See also
4 References
5 External links
History[edit]
UK driving licences were introduced by the Motor Car Act 1903 but no test was required.[8]

A test for disabled drivers was introduced by the Road Traffic Act 1930.[9]

Legislation for compulsory testing was introduced for all new drivers with the Road Traffic Act 1934. The test was initially voluntary to avoid a rush of candidates until 1 June 1935 when all people who had started to drive on or after 1 April 1934 needed to have passed the test.[9]

Testing was suspended during World War II,[9] and was suspended again during the Suez Crisis in 1956 to allow examiners help to administer petrol rations.[9]

The driving theory test was introduced in July 1996 as a written examination, which was updated to computerised format in 2000.[9]

The hazard perception segment of the theory test, was introduced in November 2002.

In January 2015, new CGI clips replaced the real-life video clips in the Hazard Perception Test.[10]

The current test[edit]
Currently, there are two tests (for a car licence) that need to be passed in order to obtain a full driving licence. First the theory test and then, within two years of passing this, the practical test.

Theory test[edit]
The theory test is made up of two parts, both of which differ according to the type of vehicle licence the candidate is pursuing:

Multiple-choice test
Hazard perception test
Both parts must be passed in order to obtain a theory test pass certificate. This enables the candidate to book a practical driving test.[6] Candidates have two years from the date that they passed the first part of their theory test to take their practical test, or they will have to pass both parts of the theory test once again before they can book a practical test.

Multiple-choice test[edit]
This part of the theory test is performed on a computer system. The test has 50 multiple choice questions and the candidate must answer at least 43 of them correctly to pass.[11] All questions are randomly selected from a bank of just under one thousand on a selection of topics.

The test lasts for 57 minutes although candidates with certain special needs can apply for more time.[12] All 50 questions must be answered. The test allows 15 minutes practice time at the start of the exam to get used to answering the questions and how to use the system. To answer a question the candidate simply touches their choice of answer from the listed answers on the computer screen. If a mistake is made the candidate can deselect a choice and reselect a different option. The candidate is allowed to go back to a question at any time and can also flag questions they are unsure of in order to find and return to it quickly and easily later.[11] To pass the test, 43 of the 50 questions (86%) must be answered correctly.[6]

For lorry and bus drivers, 100 questions are asked over a 115-minute period, and 85 out of 100 must be answered correctly to pass.

Prior to 3 September 2007, the car and motorcycle multiple-choice tests comprised 35 questions, with a pass mark of 30 within a 40-minute time limit.

Hazard perception[edit]
Main article: Hazard Perception Test
Candidates watch fourteen one-minute clips (nineteen clips for lorry and bus candidates) filmed from the perspective of a car driver or motorcyclist and have to indicate, usually by clicking a mouse button or touching the screen, when they observe a developing hazard.[13]

Practical test[edit]
Unless one is converting a foreign licence, it is necessary to have passed both components of the theory test before sitting this exam.[14] Passing the practical test then entitles one to hold a full UK driving licence.[1]

The test candidate must produce their provisional licence for the examiner before the test starts.

The practical car test can be taken in either a manual or an automatic car; if the test is passed in an automatic car, then the full licence granted will be restricted to automatic cars only.

The practical motorcycle test is split into two separate modules – the off-road module and the on-road module. To get a full motorcycle licence, the candidate needs to pass both modules. The target waiting time for a practical driving test is six weeks. However, in practice the waiting time can be considerably longer.[15]

DSA Form DL25C: Driving Test Report issued NG5 to candidates by examiners
Format[edit]
The practical car test is taken on the road, with a professionally trained DVSA examiner directing the candidate around a pre-determined route. The examiner marks the candidate for driving faults, serious faults, and dangerous faults. A candidate will fail the test if he or she accumulates any serious or dangerous faults, or more than fifteen driving faults. If a candidate accumulates several driving faults in the same category, the examiner may consider the fault habitual and mark a serious fault in that category. The test usually lasts 38 to 40 minutes in a standard test, or approximately 70 minutes when the candidate is taking an extended test after having had their licence revoked.[16]

Eyesight test[edit]
Before getting to the car, the examiner will ask the candidate to read a car’s number plate at a distance. The distance required is 20.5 metres for an old-style plate (A123 ABC) and 20 metres for a new style plate (AB51 ABC).[17] If the candidate needs glasses to do this, then they must be worn during the test. If the candidate fails to read the first number plate correctly, then the examiner asks the candidate to read a second number plate. If the candidate cannot correctly read the second number plate, then the examiner must use a tape measure to measure the correct distance between the candidate and a third number plate. If the candidate cannot read the third number plate, then the candidate is deemed to have failed and the test will not continue.

Vehicle safety questions[edit]
Before the candidate is taken out onto the road, the examiner asks two questions about car maintenance and safety. These are phrased in the form “Show me…” and “Tell me…”; as such, this component of the test is often known as “Show me, tell me”. For example:

Show me how you would check that the power assisted steering is working before starting a journey.
Open the bonnet, identify where you would check the engine oil level and tell me how you would check that the engine has sufficient oil.
A failure to answer one or both of these questions correctly would result in a driving fault being marked against the candidate. The questions that may be asked are changed from time to time. From July 2008, there are 19 different questions which can be asked in 13 different combinations.[18]

Controlled stop[edit]
The controlled stop, more commonly referred to as the “emergency stop”, is an exercise which determines the ability of the candidate to stop the vehicle promptly yet under control during a simulated emergency. The simulation is performed by the examiner raising his or her hand and saying, “STOP!”. A controlled stop exercise will be carried out on every extended test and one third of normal tests. This might be an emergency stop, or the candidate might be asked to make a controlled stop in a specific location.[16] During dangerous weather conditions, such as rain and snow, this test can be left out for safety reasons.

Manoeuvres[edit]
During the test, the examiner will ask the candidate to carry out one manoeuvre from the following list:[19]

Turn in the road, colloquially known as a “3 point turn”, although more than 3 moves may be necessary.
Reverse around a corner
Reverse park into a parking space either parallel to the kerb (on road), or oblique or right-angle (in a marked bay in an off-road car park)
This change from two manoeuvres to one was introduced to allow time for the independent driving section of the test that was introduced on 4 October 2010.

Manoeuvres are selected at random by the examiner depending on the route chosen and conditions on the route.

General driving[edit]
Generally, the candidate must demonstrate an ability to drive in various road and traffic conditions [20] and react appropriately in actual risk situations.[19] The conditions typically encountered on test include driving in urban areas as well as higher speed limit roads where possible; this includes dual carriageways but not motorways as motorways in Britain can only be used by full licence holders. The object of the test is to ensure that the candidate is well grounded in the basic principles of safe driving, and is sufficiently practised in them to be able to show, at the time of the test, that they are a competent and considerate driver and are not a source of danger to themselves or to other road users. The drive will include two or three normal stops at (and moving away from) the side of the road on level roads as well as on gradients, in addition to a demonstration of moving away from behind a stationary vehicle.[16] The regulations state that the on-road driving time must be no less than 30 minutes.[21] If at any point during the test, the examiner has to intervene with any controls, this will usually result in failure and could be marked on the test report as a dangerous fault.

Independent driving[edit]
The test includes a 10-minute section of independent driving. It is included in the following practical driving tests:

car
motorcycle module two
large goods vehicle (LGV)
passenger carrying vehicle (PCV) tests
approved driving instructor (ADI) driving ability (sometimes called ‘part two’)
taxi
During the independent driving section, candidates have to drive by:

following traffic signs to a destination, or
following a series of verbal instructions, or
following a combination of both.
To help candidates understand where they are to go, the examiner may show them a route diagram. It does not matter if candidates do not remember every direction, nor if they deviate from the intended route unless they commit a driving fault.

If there are poor or obscured traffic signs, the examiner will give the candidate directions until they can see the next traffic sign. Candidates will not need to have a detailed knowledge of the area, but will not be allowed to use Automotive navigation system for this part of the test.

If the candidate has special needs, the examiner will be able to make reasonable adjustments. For the independent driving section, this could be asking the candidate which method they prefer – following signs, or a series of directions (a maximum of three) [22]

As of 4th December 2017

The U.K driving test will change, all the relevant changes can be found here driving test or read this article [23]on the new changes being made.

DVSA, York,Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency,Driving Test Centre York,Murton Way Osbaldwick,York,,YO19 5UN

📞 We can forward your call to DVSA Now

Calls to 084 numbers cost 7ppm plus network charges. We are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned on this page. Looking for your local DVSA Driving Test Centre? Here’s everything you need to know:

Address:
DVSA Driving Test Centre, York,Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency,Driving Test Centre York,Murton Way Osbaldwick,York,,YO19 5UN


Opening hours:
Most Driving test Centres are open from 8am to 7pm on weekdays, 8am – 2pm on Saturdays and are closed on Sundays. We have been unable to determine whether this is the case for this centre.

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVSA Driving Test Centre, York,Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency,Driving Test Centre York,Murton Way Osbaldwick,York,,YO19 5UN (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
Driving Test Booking (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8930
VOSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7344
Car Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 2173
Driving Licence (general) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8928
DVLA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 507 7920
Road Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2576
Personalised Registration Plates (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8922
Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0226
Provisional Licence (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8927
Theory Test (bookings) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8924
Medical Issues (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7271
V5C and Log Books (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075
Driver Check Service (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075

About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About UK Driving Tests
from Wikipedia

The United Kingdom driving test is a test of competence that UK residents take in order to obtain a full Great Britain or Northern Ireland (car) driving licence or to add additional full entitlements to an existing one.[1] Tests vary depending on the class of vehicle to be driven. In Great Britain it is administered by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA)[2] and in Northern Ireland by the Driver & Vehicle Agency (DVA).[3]

The minimum age at which one can take a UK driving test is currently 16 for mopeds and 17 for cars (16 for those on the higher/enhanced rate of the mobility component of DLA or PIP[4]). There is no upper age limit. In addition to a driving licence, a CBT certificate may be required before a moped or motorcycle is ridden.[5]

In GB around 1.6 million people sit the practical car test per year, with a pass rate of around 43%.[6] The theory test has a pass rate of around 51.6%.[7]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 The current test
2.1 Theory test
2.1.1 Multiple-choice test
2.1.2 Hazard perception
2.2 Practical test
2.2.1 Format
2.2.2 Eyesight test
2.2.3 Vehicle safety questions
2.2.4 Controlled stop
2.2.5 Manoeuvres
2.2.6 General driving
2.2.7 Independent driving
3 See also
4 References
5 External links
History[edit]
UK driving licences were introduced by the Motor Car Act 1903 but no test was required.[8]

A test for disabled drivers was introduced by the Road Traffic Act 1930.[9]

Legislation for compulsory testing was introduced for all new drivers with the Road Traffic Act 1934. The test was initially voluntary to avoid a rush of candidates until 1 June 1935 when all people who had started to drive on or after 1 April 1934 needed to have passed the test.[9]

Testing was suspended during World War II,[9] and was suspended again during the Suez Crisis in 1956 to allow examiners help to administer petrol rations.[9]

The driving theory test was introduced in July 1996 as a written examination, which was updated to computerised format in 2000.[9]

The hazard perception segment of the theory test, was introduced in November 2002.

In January 2015, new CGI clips replaced the real-life video clips in the Hazard Perception Test.[10]

The current test[edit]
Currently, there are two tests (for a car licence) that need to be passed in order to obtain a full driving licence. First the theory test and then, within two years of passing this, the practical test.

Theory test[edit]
The theory test is made up of two parts, both of which differ according to the type of vehicle licence the candidate is pursuing:

Multiple-choice test
Hazard perception test
Both parts must be passed in order to obtain a theory test pass certificate. This enables the candidate to book a practical driving test.[6] Candidates have two years from the date that they passed the first part of their theory test to take their practical test, or they will have to pass both parts of the theory test once again before they can book a practical test.

Multiple-choice test[edit]
This part of the theory test is performed on a computer system. The test has 50 multiple choice questions and the candidate must answer at least 43 of them correctly to pass.[11] All questions are randomly selected from a bank of just under one thousand on a selection of topics.

The test lasts for 57 minutes although candidates with certain special needs can apply for more time.[12] All 50 questions must be answered. The test allows 15 minutes practice time at the start of the exam to get used to answering the questions and how to use the system. To answer a question the candidate simply touches their choice of answer from the listed answers on the computer screen. If a mistake is made the candidate can deselect a choice and reselect a different option. The candidate is allowed to go back to a question at any time and can also flag questions they are unsure of in order to find and return to it quickly and easily later.[11] To pass the test, 43 of the 50 questions (86%) must be answered correctly.[6]

For lorry and bus drivers, 100 questions are asked over a 115-minute period, and 85 out of 100 must be answered correctly to pass.

Prior to 3 September 2007, the car and motorcycle multiple-choice tests comprised 35 questions, with a pass mark of 30 within a 40-minute time limit.

Hazard perception[edit]
Main article: Hazard Perception Test
Candidates watch fourteen one-minute clips (nineteen clips for lorry and bus candidates) filmed from the perspective of a car driver or motorcyclist and have to indicate, usually by clicking a mouse button or touching the screen, when they observe a developing hazard.[13]

Practical test[edit]
Unless one is converting a foreign licence, it is necessary to have passed both components of the theory test before sitting this exam.[14] Passing the practical test then entitles one to hold a full UK driving licence.[1]

The test candidate must produce their provisional licence for the examiner before the test starts.

The practical car test can be taken in either a manual or an automatic car; if the test is passed in an automatic car, then the full licence granted will be restricted to automatic cars only.

The practical motorcycle test is split into two separate modules – the off-road module and the on-road module. To get a full motorcycle licence, the candidate needs to pass both modules. The target waiting time for a practical driving test is six weeks. However, in practice the waiting time can be considerably longer.[15]

DSA Form DL25C: Driving Test Report issued NG5 to candidates by examiners
Format[edit]
The practical car test is taken on the road, with a professionally trained DVSA examiner directing the candidate around a pre-determined route. The examiner marks the candidate for driving faults, serious faults, and dangerous faults. A candidate will fail the test if he or she accumulates any serious or dangerous faults, or more than fifteen driving faults. If a candidate accumulates several driving faults in the same category, the examiner may consider the fault habitual and mark a serious fault in that category. The test usually lasts 38 to 40 minutes in a standard test, or approximately 70 minutes when the candidate is taking an extended test after having had their licence revoked.[16]

Eyesight test[edit]
Before getting to the car, the examiner will ask the candidate to read a car’s number plate at a distance. The distance required is 20.5 metres for an old-style plate (A123 ABC) and 20 metres for a new style plate (AB51 ABC).[17] If the candidate needs glasses to do this, then they must be worn during the test. If the candidate fails to read the first number plate correctly, then the examiner asks the candidate to read a second number plate. If the candidate cannot correctly read the second number plate, then the examiner must use a tape measure to measure the correct distance between the candidate and a third number plate. If the candidate cannot read the third number plate, then the candidate is deemed to have failed and the test will not continue.

Vehicle safety questions[edit]
Before the candidate is taken out onto the road, the examiner asks two questions about car maintenance and safety. These are phrased in the form “Show me…” and “Tell me…”; as such, this component of the test is often known as “Show me, tell me”. For example:

Show me how you would check that the power assisted steering is working before starting a journey.
Open the bonnet, identify where you would check the engine oil level and tell me how you would check that the engine has sufficient oil.
A failure to answer one or both of these questions correctly would result in a driving fault being marked against the candidate. The questions that may be asked are changed from time to time. From July 2008, there are 19 different questions which can be asked in 13 different combinations.[18]

Controlled stop[edit]
The controlled stop, more commonly referred to as the “emergency stop”, is an exercise which determines the ability of the candidate to stop the vehicle promptly yet under control during a simulated emergency. The simulation is performed by the examiner raising his or her hand and saying, “STOP!”. A controlled stop exercise will be carried out on every extended test and one third of normal tests. This might be an emergency stop, or the candidate might be asked to make a controlled stop in a specific location.[16] During dangerous weather conditions, such as rain and snow, this test can be left out for safety reasons.

Manoeuvres[edit]
During the test, the examiner will ask the candidate to carry out one manoeuvre from the following list:[19]

Turn in the road, colloquially known as a “3 point turn”, although more than 3 moves may be necessary.
Reverse around a corner
Reverse park into a parking space either parallel to the kerb (on road), or oblique or right-angle (in a marked bay in an off-road car park)
This change from two manoeuvres to one was introduced to allow time for the independent driving section of the test that was introduced on 4 October 2010.

Manoeuvres are selected at random by the examiner depending on the route chosen and conditions on the route.

General driving[edit]
Generally, the candidate must demonstrate an ability to drive in various road and traffic conditions [20] and react appropriately in actual risk situations.[19] The conditions typically encountered on test include driving in urban areas as well as higher speed limit roads where possible; this includes dual carriageways but not motorways as motorways in Britain can only be used by full licence holders. The object of the test is to ensure that the candidate is well grounded in the basic principles of safe driving, and is sufficiently practised in them to be able to show, at the time of the test, that they are a competent and considerate driver and are not a source of danger to themselves or to other road users. The drive will include two or three normal stops at (and moving away from) the side of the road on level roads as well as on gradients, in addition to a demonstration of moving away from behind a stationary vehicle.[16] The regulations state that the on-road driving time must be no less than 30 minutes.[21] If at any point during the test, the examiner has to intervene with any controls, this will usually result in failure and could be marked on the test report as a dangerous fault.

Independent driving[edit]
The test includes a 10-minute section of independent driving. It is included in the following practical driving tests:

car
motorcycle module two
large goods vehicle (LGV)
passenger carrying vehicle (PCV) tests
approved driving instructor (ADI) driving ability (sometimes called ‘part two’)
taxi
During the independent driving section, candidates have to drive by:

following traffic signs to a destination, or
following a series of verbal instructions, or
following a combination of both.
To help candidates understand where they are to go, the examiner may show them a route diagram. It does not matter if candidates do not remember every direction, nor if they deviate from the intended route unless they commit a driving fault.

If there are poor or obscured traffic signs, the examiner will give the candidate directions until they can see the next traffic sign. Candidates will not need to have a detailed knowledge of the area, but will not be allowed to use Automotive navigation system for this part of the test.

If the candidate has special needs, the examiner will be able to make reasonable adjustments. For the independent driving section, this could be asking the candidate which method they prefer – following signs, or a series of directions (a maximum of three) [22]

As of 4th December 2017

The U.K driving test will change, all the relevant changes can be found here driving test or read this article [23]on the new changes being made.

DVSA, Worthing,Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency,Driving Test Centre Worthing,”Westmorland House, Strand Parade”,Goring by Sea,,BN12 6EA

📞 We can forward your call to DVSA Now

Calls to 084 numbers cost 7ppm plus network charges. We are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned on this page. Looking for your local DVSA Driving Test Centre? Here’s everything you need to know:

Address:
DVSA Driving Test Centre, Worthing,Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency,Driving Test Centre Worthing,”Westmorland House, Strand Parade”,Goring by Sea,,BN12 6EA


Opening hours:
Most Driving test Centres are open from 8am to 7pm on weekdays, 8am – 2pm on Saturdays and are closed on Sundays. We have been unable to determine whether this is the case for this centre.

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVSA Driving Test Centre, Worthing,Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency,Driving Test Centre Worthing,”Westmorland House, Strand Parade”,Goring by Sea,,BN12 6EA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
Driving Test Booking (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8930
VOSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7344
Car Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 2173
Driving Licence (general) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8928
DVLA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 507 7920
Road Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2576
Personalised Registration Plates (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8922
Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0226
Provisional Licence (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8927
Theory Test (bookings) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8924
Medical Issues (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7271
V5C and Log Books (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075
Driver Check Service (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075

About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About UK Driving Tests
from Wikipedia

The United Kingdom driving test is a test of competence that UK residents take in order to obtain a full Great Britain or Northern Ireland (car) driving licence or to add additional full entitlements to an existing one.[1] Tests vary depending on the class of vehicle to be driven. In Great Britain it is administered by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA)[2] and in Northern Ireland by the Driver & Vehicle Agency (DVA).[3]

The minimum age at which one can take a UK driving test is currently 16 for mopeds and 17 for cars (16 for those on the higher/enhanced rate of the mobility component of DLA or PIP[4]). There is no upper age limit. In addition to a driving licence, a CBT certificate may be required before a moped or motorcycle is ridden.[5]

In GB around 1.6 million people sit the practical car test per year, with a pass rate of around 43%.[6] The theory test has a pass rate of around 51.6%.[7]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 The current test
2.1 Theory test
2.1.1 Multiple-choice test
2.1.2 Hazard perception
2.2 Practical test
2.2.1 Format
2.2.2 Eyesight test
2.2.3 Vehicle safety questions
2.2.4 Controlled stop
2.2.5 Manoeuvres
2.2.6 General driving
2.2.7 Independent driving
3 See also
4 References
5 External links
History[edit]
UK driving licences were introduced by the Motor Car Act 1903 but no test was required.[8]

A test for disabled drivers was introduced by the Road Traffic Act 1930.[9]

Legislation for compulsory testing was introduced for all new drivers with the Road Traffic Act 1934. The test was initially voluntary to avoid a rush of candidates until 1 June 1935 when all people who had started to drive on or after 1 April 1934 needed to have passed the test.[9]

Testing was suspended during World War II,[9] and was suspended again during the Suez Crisis in 1956 to allow examiners help to administer petrol rations.[9]

The driving theory test was introduced in July 1996 as a written examination, which was updated to computerised format in 2000.[9]

The hazard perception segment of the theory test, was introduced in November 2002.

In January 2015, new CGI clips replaced the real-life video clips in the Hazard Perception Test.[10]

The current test[edit]
Currently, there are two tests (for a car licence) that need to be passed in order to obtain a full driving licence. First the theory test and then, within two years of passing this, the practical test.

Theory test[edit]
The theory test is made up of two parts, both of which differ according to the type of vehicle licence the candidate is pursuing:

Multiple-choice test
Hazard perception test
Both parts must be passed in order to obtain a theory test pass certificate. This enables the candidate to book a practical driving test.[6] Candidates have two years from the date that they passed the first part of their theory test to take their practical test, or they will have to pass both parts of the theory test once again before they can book a practical test.

Multiple-choice test[edit]
This part of the theory test is performed on a computer system. The test has 50 multiple choice questions and the candidate must answer at least 43 of them correctly to pass.[11] All questions are randomly selected from a bank of just under one thousand on a selection of topics.

The test lasts for 57 minutes although candidates with certain special needs can apply for more time.[12] All 50 questions must be answered. The test allows 15 minutes practice time at the start of the exam to get used to answering the questions and how to use the system. To answer a question the candidate simply touches their choice of answer from the listed answers on the computer screen. If a mistake is made the candidate can deselect a choice and reselect a different option. The candidate is allowed to go back to a question at any time and can also flag questions they are unsure of in order to find and return to it quickly and easily later.[11] To pass the test, 43 of the 50 questions (86%) must be answered correctly.[6]

For lorry and bus drivers, 100 questions are asked over a 115-minute period, and 85 out of 100 must be answered correctly to pass.

Prior to 3 September 2007, the car and motorcycle multiple-choice tests comprised 35 questions, with a pass mark of 30 within a 40-minute time limit.

Hazard perception[edit]
Main article: Hazard Perception Test
Candidates watch fourteen one-minute clips (nineteen clips for lorry and bus candidates) filmed from the perspective of a car driver or motorcyclist and have to indicate, usually by clicking a mouse button or touching the screen, when they observe a developing hazard.[13]

Practical test[edit]
Unless one is converting a foreign licence, it is necessary to have passed both components of the theory test before sitting this exam.[14] Passing the practical test then entitles one to hold a full UK driving licence.[1]

The test candidate must produce their provisional licence for the examiner before the test starts.

The practical car test can be taken in either a manual or an automatic car; if the test is passed in an automatic car, then the full licence granted will be restricted to automatic cars only.

The practical motorcycle test is split into two separate modules – the off-road module and the on-road module. To get a full motorcycle licence, the candidate needs to pass both modules. The target waiting time for a practical driving test is six weeks. However, in practice the waiting time can be considerably longer.[15]

DSA Form DL25C: Driving Test Report issued NG5 to candidates by examiners
Format[edit]
The practical car test is taken on the road, with a professionally trained DVSA examiner directing the candidate around a pre-determined route. The examiner marks the candidate for driving faults, serious faults, and dangerous faults. A candidate will fail the test if he or she accumulates any serious or dangerous faults, or more than fifteen driving faults. If a candidate accumulates several driving faults in the same category, the examiner may consider the fault habitual and mark a serious fault in that category. The test usually lasts 38 to 40 minutes in a standard test, or approximately 70 minutes when the candidate is taking an extended test after having had their licence revoked.[16]

Eyesight test[edit]
Before getting to the car, the examiner will ask the candidate to read a car’s number plate at a distance. The distance required is 20.5 metres for an old-style plate (A123 ABC) and 20 metres for a new style plate (AB51 ABC).[17] If the candidate needs glasses to do this, then they must be worn during the test. If the candidate fails to read the first number plate correctly, then the examiner asks the candidate to read a second number plate. If the candidate cannot correctly read the second number plate, then the examiner must use a tape measure to measure the correct distance between the candidate and a third number plate. If the candidate cannot read the third number plate, then the candidate is deemed to have failed and the test will not continue.

Vehicle safety questions[edit]
Before the candidate is taken out onto the road, the examiner asks two questions about car maintenance and safety. These are phrased in the form “Show me…” and “Tell me…”; as such, this component of the test is often known as “Show me, tell me”. For example:

Show me how you would check that the power assisted steering is working before starting a journey.
Open the bonnet, identify where you would check the engine oil level and tell me how you would check that the engine has sufficient oil.
A failure to answer one or both of these questions correctly would result in a driving fault being marked against the candidate. The questions that may be asked are changed from time to time. From July 2008, there are 19 different questions which can be asked in 13 different combinations.[18]

Controlled stop[edit]
The controlled stop, more commonly referred to as the “emergency stop”, is an exercise which determines the ability of the candidate to stop the vehicle promptly yet under control during a simulated emergency. The simulation is performed by the examiner raising his or her hand and saying, “STOP!”. A controlled stop exercise will be carried out on every extended test and one third of normal tests. This might be an emergency stop, or the candidate might be asked to make a controlled stop in a specific location.[16] During dangerous weather conditions, such as rain and snow, this test can be left out for safety reasons.

Manoeuvres[edit]
During the test, the examiner will ask the candidate to carry out one manoeuvre from the following list:[19]

Turn in the road, colloquially known as a “3 point turn”, although more than 3 moves may be necessary.
Reverse around a corner
Reverse park into a parking space either parallel to the kerb (on road), or oblique or right-angle (in a marked bay in an off-road car park)
This change from two manoeuvres to one was introduced to allow time for the independent driving section of the test that was introduced on 4 October 2010.

Manoeuvres are selected at random by the examiner depending on the route chosen and conditions on the route.

General driving[edit]
Generally, the candidate must demonstrate an ability to drive in various road and traffic conditions [20] and react appropriately in actual risk situations.[19] The conditions typically encountered on test include driving in urban areas as well as higher speed limit roads where possible; this includes dual carriageways but not motorways as motorways in Britain can only be used by full licence holders. The object of the test is to ensure that the candidate is well grounded in the basic principles of safe driving, and is sufficiently practised in them to be able to show, at the time of the test, that they are a competent and considerate driver and are not a source of danger to themselves or to other road users. The drive will include two or three normal stops at (and moving away from) the side of the road on level roads as well as on gradients, in addition to a demonstration of moving away from behind a stationary vehicle.[16] The regulations state that the on-road driving time must be no less than 30 minutes.[21] If at any point during the test, the examiner has to intervene with any controls, this will usually result in failure and could be marked on the test report as a dangerous fault.

Independent driving[edit]
The test includes a 10-minute section of independent driving. It is included in the following practical driving tests:

car
motorcycle module two
large goods vehicle (LGV)
passenger carrying vehicle (PCV) tests
approved driving instructor (ADI) driving ability (sometimes called ‘part two’)
taxi
During the independent driving section, candidates have to drive by:

following traffic signs to a destination, or
following a series of verbal instructions, or
following a combination of both.
To help candidates understand where they are to go, the examiner may show them a route diagram. It does not matter if candidates do not remember every direction, nor if they deviate from the intended route unless they commit a driving fault.

If there are poor or obscured traffic signs, the examiner will give the candidate directions until they can see the next traffic sign. Candidates will not need to have a detailed knowledge of the area, but will not be allowed to use Automotive navigation system for this part of the test.

If the candidate has special needs, the examiner will be able to make reasonable adjustments. For the independent driving section, this could be asking the candidate which method they prefer – following signs, or a series of directions (a maximum of three) [22]

As of 4th December 2017

The U.K driving test will change, all the relevant changes can be found here driving test or read this article [23]on the new changes being made.

DVSA, Wrexham,Ground Floor,1 Birchall House,Wrexham Technology Park,,Wrexham,LL13 7YP

📞 We can forward your call to DVSA Now

Calls to 084 numbers cost 7ppm plus network charges. We are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned on this page. Looking for your local DVSA Driving Test Centre? Here’s everything you need to know:

Address:
DVSA Driving Test Centre, Wrexham,Ground Floor,1 Birchall House,Wrexham Technology Park,,Wrexham,LL13 7YP


Opening hours:
Most Driving test Centres are open from 8am to 7pm on weekdays, 8am – 2pm on Saturdays and are closed on Sundays. We have been unable to determine whether this is the case for this centre.

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVSA Driving Test Centre, Wrexham,Ground Floor,1 Birchall House,Wrexham Technology Park,,Wrexham,LL13 7YP (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
Driving Test Booking (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8930
VOSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7344
Car Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 2173
Driving Licence (general) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8928
DVLA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 507 7920
Road Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2576
Personalised Registration Plates (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8922
Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0226
Provisional Licence (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8927
Theory Test (bookings) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8924
Medical Issues (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7271
V5C and Log Books (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075
Driver Check Service (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075

About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About UK Driving Tests
from Wikipedia

The United Kingdom driving test is a test of competence that UK residents take in order to obtain a full Great Britain or Northern Ireland (car) driving licence or to add additional full entitlements to an existing one.[1] Tests vary depending on the class of vehicle to be driven. In Great Britain it is administered by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA)[2] and in Northern Ireland by the Driver & Vehicle Agency (DVA).[3]

The minimum age at which one can take a UK driving test is currently 16 for mopeds and 17 for cars (16 for those on the higher/enhanced rate of the mobility component of DLA or PIP[4]). There is no upper age limit. In addition to a driving licence, a CBT certificate may be required before a moped or motorcycle is ridden.[5]

In GB around 1.6 million people sit the practical car test per year, with a pass rate of around 43%.[6] The theory test has a pass rate of around 51.6%.[7]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 The current test
2.1 Theory test
2.1.1 Multiple-choice test
2.1.2 Hazard perception
2.2 Practical test
2.2.1 Format
2.2.2 Eyesight test
2.2.3 Vehicle safety questions
2.2.4 Controlled stop
2.2.5 Manoeuvres
2.2.6 General driving
2.2.7 Independent driving
3 See also
4 References
5 External links
History[edit]
UK driving licences were introduced by the Motor Car Act 1903 but no test was required.[8]

A test for disabled drivers was introduced by the Road Traffic Act 1930.[9]

Legislation for compulsory testing was introduced for all new drivers with the Road Traffic Act 1934. The test was initially voluntary to avoid a rush of candidates until 1 June 1935 when all people who had started to drive on or after 1 April 1934 needed to have passed the test.[9]

Testing was suspended during World War II,[9] and was suspended again during the Suez Crisis in 1956 to allow examiners help to administer petrol rations.[9]

The driving theory test was introduced in July 1996 as a written examination, which was updated to computerised format in 2000.[9]

The hazard perception segment of the theory test, was introduced in November 2002.

In January 2015, new CGI clips replaced the real-life video clips in the Hazard Perception Test.[10]

The current test[edit]
Currently, there are two tests (for a car licence) that need to be passed in order to obtain a full driving licence. First the theory test and then, within two years of passing this, the practical test.

Theory test[edit]
The theory test is made up of two parts, both of which differ according to the type of vehicle licence the candidate is pursuing:

Multiple-choice test
Hazard perception test
Both parts must be passed in order to obtain a theory test pass certificate. This enables the candidate to book a practical driving test.[6] Candidates have two years from the date that they passed the first part of their theory test to take their practical test, or they will have to pass both parts of the theory test once again before they can book a practical test.

Multiple-choice test[edit]
This part of the theory test is performed on a computer system. The test has 50 multiple choice questions and the candidate must answer at least 43 of them correctly to pass.[11] All questions are randomly selected from a bank of just under one thousand on a selection of topics.

The test lasts for 57 minutes although candidates with certain special needs can apply for more time.[12] All 50 questions must be answered. The test allows 15 minutes practice time at the start of the exam to get used to answering the questions and how to use the system. To answer a question the candidate simply touches their choice of answer from the listed answers on the computer screen. If a mistake is made the candidate can deselect a choice and reselect a different option. The candidate is allowed to go back to a question at any time and can also flag questions they are unsure of in order to find and return to it quickly and easily later.[11] To pass the test, 43 of the 50 questions (86%) must be answered correctly.[6]

For lorry and bus drivers, 100 questions are asked over a 115-minute period, and 85 out of 100 must be answered correctly to pass.

Prior to 3 September 2007, the car and motorcycle multiple-choice tests comprised 35 questions, with a pass mark of 30 within a 40-minute time limit.

Hazard perception[edit]
Main article: Hazard Perception Test
Candidates watch fourteen one-minute clips (nineteen clips for lorry and bus candidates) filmed from the perspective of a car driver or motorcyclist and have to indicate, usually by clicking a mouse button or touching the screen, when they observe a developing hazard.[13]

Practical test[edit]
Unless one is converting a foreign licence, it is necessary to have passed both components of the theory test before sitting this exam.[14] Passing the practical test then entitles one to hold a full UK driving licence.[1]

The test candidate must produce their provisional licence for the examiner before the test starts.

The practical car test can be taken in either a manual or an automatic car; if the test is passed in an automatic car, then the full licence granted will be restricted to automatic cars only.

The practical motorcycle test is split into two separate modules – the off-road module and the on-road module. To get a full motorcycle licence, the candidate needs to pass both modules. The target waiting time for a practical driving test is six weeks. However, in practice the waiting time can be considerably longer.[15]

DSA Form DL25C: Driving Test Report issued NG5 to candidates by examiners
Format[edit]
The practical car test is taken on the road, with a professionally trained DVSA examiner directing the candidate around a pre-determined route. The examiner marks the candidate for driving faults, serious faults, and dangerous faults. A candidate will fail the test if he or she accumulates any serious or dangerous faults, or more than fifteen driving faults. If a candidate accumulates several driving faults in the same category, the examiner may consider the fault habitual and mark a serious fault in that category. The test usually lasts 38 to 40 minutes in a standard test, or approximately 70 minutes when the candidate is taking an extended test after having had their licence revoked.[16]

Eyesight test[edit]
Before getting to the car, the examiner will ask the candidate to read a car’s number plate at a distance. The distance required is 20.5 metres for an old-style plate (A123 ABC) and 20 metres for a new style plate (AB51 ABC).[17] If the candidate needs glasses to do this, then they must be worn during the test. If the candidate fails to read the first number plate correctly, then the examiner asks the candidate to read a second number plate. If the candidate cannot correctly read the second number plate, then the examiner must use a tape measure to measure the correct distance between the candidate and a third number plate. If the candidate cannot read the third number plate, then the candidate is deemed to have failed and the test will not continue.

Vehicle safety questions[edit]
Before the candidate is taken out onto the road, the examiner asks two questions about car maintenance and safety. These are phrased in the form “Show me…” and “Tell me…”; as such, this component of the test is often known as “Show me, tell me”. For example:

Show me how you would check that the power assisted steering is working before starting a journey.
Open the bonnet, identify where you would check the engine oil level and tell me how you would check that the engine has sufficient oil.
A failure to answer one or both of these questions correctly would result in a driving fault being marked against the candidate. The questions that may be asked are changed from time to time. From July 2008, there are 19 different questions which can be asked in 13 different combinations.[18]

Controlled stop[edit]
The controlled stop, more commonly referred to as the “emergency stop”, is an exercise which determines the ability of the candidate to stop the vehicle promptly yet under control during a simulated emergency. The simulation is performed by the examiner raising his or her hand and saying, “STOP!”. A controlled stop exercise will be carried out on every extended test and one third of normal tests. This might be an emergency stop, or the candidate might be asked to make a controlled stop in a specific location.[16] During dangerous weather conditions, such as rain and snow, this test can be left out for safety reasons.

Manoeuvres[edit]
During the test, the examiner will ask the candidate to carry out one manoeuvre from the following list:[19]

Turn in the road, colloquially known as a “3 point turn”, although more than 3 moves may be necessary.
Reverse around a corner
Reverse park into a parking space either parallel to the kerb (on road), or oblique or right-angle (in a marked bay in an off-road car park)
This change from two manoeuvres to one was introduced to allow time for the independent driving section of the test that was introduced on 4 October 2010.

Manoeuvres are selected at random by the examiner depending on the route chosen and conditions on the route.

General driving[edit]
Generally, the candidate must demonstrate an ability to drive in various road and traffic conditions [20] and react appropriately in actual risk situations.[19] The conditions typically encountered on test include driving in urban areas as well as higher speed limit roads where possible; this includes dual carriageways but not motorways as motorways in Britain can only be used by full licence holders. The object of the test is to ensure that the candidate is well grounded in the basic principles of safe driving, and is sufficiently practised in them to be able to show, at the time of the test, that they are a competent and considerate driver and are not a source of danger to themselves or to other road users. The drive will include two or three normal stops at (and moving away from) the side of the road on level roads as well as on gradients, in addition to a demonstration of moving away from behind a stationary vehicle.[16] The regulations state that the on-road driving time must be no less than 30 minutes.[21] If at any point during the test, the examiner has to intervene with any controls, this will usually result in failure and could be marked on the test report as a dangerous fault.

Independent driving[edit]
The test includes a 10-minute section of independent driving. It is included in the following practical driving tests:

car
motorcycle module two
large goods vehicle (LGV)
passenger carrying vehicle (PCV) tests
approved driving instructor (ADI) driving ability (sometimes called ‘part two’)
taxi
During the independent driving section, candidates have to drive by:

following traffic signs to a destination, or
following a series of verbal instructions, or
following a combination of both.
To help candidates understand where they are to go, the examiner may show them a route diagram. It does not matter if candidates do not remember every direction, nor if they deviate from the intended route unless they commit a driving fault.

If there are poor or obscured traffic signs, the examiner will give the candidate directions until they can see the next traffic sign. Candidates will not need to have a detailed knowledge of the area, but will not be allowed to use Automotive navigation system for this part of the test.

If the candidate has special needs, the examiner will be able to make reasonable adjustments. For the independent driving section, this could be asking the candidate which method they prefer – following signs, or a series of directions (a maximum of three) [22]

As of 4th December 2017

The U.K driving test will change, all the relevant changes can be found here driving test or read this article [23]on the new changes being made.

DVSA, Wrexham LGV,Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency,Driving Test Centre Wrexham LGV,Llay Road,Llay,,LL12 0TL

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Address:
DVSA Driving Test Centre, Wrexham LGV,Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency,Driving Test Centre Wrexham LGV,Llay Road,Llay,,LL12 0TL


Opening hours:
Most Driving test Centres are open from 8am to 7pm on weekdays, 8am – 2pm on Saturdays and are closed on Sundays. We have been unable to determine whether this is the case for this centre.

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVSA Driving Test Centre, Wrexham LGV,Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency,Driving Test Centre Wrexham LGV,Llay Road,Llay,,LL12 0TL (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
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About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About UK Driving Tests
from Wikipedia

The United Kingdom driving test is a test of competence that UK residents take in order to obtain a full Great Britain or Northern Ireland (car) driving licence or to add additional full entitlements to an existing one.[1] Tests vary depending on the class of vehicle to be driven. In Great Britain it is administered by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA)[2] and in Northern Ireland by the Driver & Vehicle Agency (DVA).[3]

The minimum age at which one can take a UK driving test is currently 16 for mopeds and 17 for cars (16 for those on the higher/enhanced rate of the mobility component of DLA or PIP[4]). There is no upper age limit. In addition to a driving licence, a CBT certificate may be required before a moped or motorcycle is ridden.[5]

In GB around 1.6 million people sit the practical car test per year, with a pass rate of around 43%.[6] The theory test has a pass rate of around 51.6%.[7]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 The current test
2.1 Theory test
2.1.1 Multiple-choice test
2.1.2 Hazard perception
2.2 Practical test
2.2.1 Format
2.2.2 Eyesight test
2.2.3 Vehicle safety questions
2.2.4 Controlled stop
2.2.5 Manoeuvres
2.2.6 General driving
2.2.7 Independent driving
3 See also
4 References
5 External links
History[edit]
UK driving licences were introduced by the Motor Car Act 1903 but no test was required.[8]

A test for disabled drivers was introduced by the Road Traffic Act 1930.[9]

Legislation for compulsory testing was introduced for all new drivers with the Road Traffic Act 1934. The test was initially voluntary to avoid a rush of candidates until 1 June 1935 when all people who had started to drive on or after 1 April 1934 needed to have passed the test.[9]

Testing was suspended during World War II,[9] and was suspended again during the Suez Crisis in 1956 to allow examiners help to administer petrol rations.[9]

The driving theory test was introduced in July 1996 as a written examination, which was updated to computerised format in 2000.[9]

The hazard perception segment of the theory test, was introduced in November 2002.

In January 2015, new CGI clips replaced the real-life video clips in the Hazard Perception Test.[10]

The current test[edit]
Currently, there are two tests (for a car licence) that need to be passed in order to obtain a full driving licence. First the theory test and then, within two years of passing this, the practical test.

Theory test[edit]
The theory test is made up of two parts, both of which differ according to the type of vehicle licence the candidate is pursuing:

Multiple-choice test
Hazard perception test
Both parts must be passed in order to obtain a theory test pass certificate. This enables the candidate to book a practical driving test.[6] Candidates have two years from the date that they passed the first part of their theory test to take their practical test, or they will have to pass both parts of the theory test once again before they can book a practical test.

Multiple-choice test[edit]
This part of the theory test is performed on a computer system. The test has 50 multiple choice questions and the candidate must answer at least 43 of them correctly to pass.[11] All questions are randomly selected from a bank of just under one thousand on a selection of topics.

The test lasts for 57 minutes although candidates with certain special needs can apply for more time.[12] All 50 questions must be answered. The test allows 15 minutes practice time at the start of the exam to get used to answering the questions and how to use the system. To answer a question the candidate simply touches their choice of answer from the listed answers on the computer screen. If a mistake is made the candidate can deselect a choice and reselect a different option. The candidate is allowed to go back to a question at any time and can also flag questions they are unsure of in order to find and return to it quickly and easily later.[11] To pass the test, 43 of the 50 questions (86%) must be answered correctly.[6]

For lorry and bus drivers, 100 questions are asked over a 115-minute period, and 85 out of 100 must be answered correctly to pass.

Prior to 3 September 2007, the car and motorcycle multiple-choice tests comprised 35 questions, with a pass mark of 30 within a 40-minute time limit.

Hazard perception[edit]
Main article: Hazard Perception Test
Candidates watch fourteen one-minute clips (nineteen clips for lorry and bus candidates) filmed from the perspective of a car driver or motorcyclist and have to indicate, usually by clicking a mouse button or touching the screen, when they observe a developing hazard.[13]

Practical test[edit]
Unless one is converting a foreign licence, it is necessary to have passed both components of the theory test before sitting this exam.[14] Passing the practical test then entitles one to hold a full UK driving licence.[1]

The test candidate must produce their provisional licence for the examiner before the test starts.

The practical car test can be taken in either a manual or an automatic car; if the test is passed in an automatic car, then the full licence granted will be restricted to automatic cars only.

The practical motorcycle test is split into two separate modules – the off-road module and the on-road module. To get a full motorcycle licence, the candidate needs to pass both modules. The target waiting time for a practical driving test is six weeks. However, in practice the waiting time can be considerably longer.[15]

DSA Form DL25C: Driving Test Report issued NG5 to candidates by examiners
Format[edit]
The practical car test is taken on the road, with a professionally trained DVSA examiner directing the candidate around a pre-determined route. The examiner marks the candidate for driving faults, serious faults, and dangerous faults. A candidate will fail the test if he or she accumulates any serious or dangerous faults, or more than fifteen driving faults. If a candidate accumulates several driving faults in the same category, the examiner may consider the fault habitual and mark a serious fault in that category. The test usually lasts 38 to 40 minutes in a standard test, or approximately 70 minutes when the candidate is taking an extended test after having had their licence revoked.[16]

Eyesight test[edit]
Before getting to the car, the examiner will ask the candidate to read a car’s number plate at a distance. The distance required is 20.5 metres for an old-style plate (A123 ABC) and 20 metres for a new style plate (AB51 ABC).[17] If the candidate needs glasses to do this, then they must be worn during the test. If the candidate fails to read the first number plate correctly, then the examiner asks the candidate to read a second number plate. If the candidate cannot correctly read the second number plate, then the examiner must use a tape measure to measure the correct distance between the candidate and a third number plate. If the candidate cannot read the third number plate, then the candidate is deemed to have failed and the test will not continue.

Vehicle safety questions[edit]
Before the candidate is taken out onto the road, the examiner asks two questions about car maintenance and safety. These are phrased in the form “Show me…” and “Tell me…”; as such, this component of the test is often known as “Show me, tell me”. For example:

Show me how you would check that the power assisted steering is working before starting a journey.
Open the bonnet, identify where you would check the engine oil level and tell me how you would check that the engine has sufficient oil.
A failure to answer one or both of these questions correctly would result in a driving fault being marked against the candidate. The questions that may be asked are changed from time to time. From July 2008, there are 19 different questions which can be asked in 13 different combinations.[18]

Controlled stop[edit]
The controlled stop, more commonly referred to as the “emergency stop”, is an exercise which determines the ability of the candidate to stop the vehicle promptly yet under control during a simulated emergency. The simulation is performed by the examiner raising his or her hand and saying, “STOP!”. A controlled stop exercise will be carried out on every extended test and one third of normal tests. This might be an emergency stop, or the candidate might be asked to make a controlled stop in a specific location.[16] During dangerous weather conditions, such as rain and snow, this test can be left out for safety reasons.

Manoeuvres[edit]
During the test, the examiner will ask the candidate to carry out one manoeuvre from the following list:[19]

Turn in the road, colloquially known as a “3 point turn”, although more than 3 moves may be necessary.
Reverse around a corner
Reverse park into a parking space either parallel to the kerb (on road), or oblique or right-angle (in a marked bay in an off-road car park)
This change from two manoeuvres to one was introduced to allow time for the independent driving section of the test that was introduced on 4 October 2010.

Manoeuvres are selected at random by the examiner depending on the route chosen and conditions on the route.

General driving[edit]
Generally, the candidate must demonstrate an ability to drive in various road and traffic conditions [20] and react appropriately in actual risk situations.[19] The conditions typically encountered on test include driving in urban areas as well as higher speed limit roads where possible; this includes dual carriageways but not motorways as motorways in Britain can only be used by full licence holders. The object of the test is to ensure that the candidate is well grounded in the basic principles of safe driving, and is sufficiently practised in them to be able to show, at the time of the test, that they are a competent and considerate driver and are not a source of danger to themselves or to other road users. The drive will include two or three normal stops at (and moving away from) the side of the road on level roads as well as on gradients, in addition to a demonstration of moving away from behind a stationary vehicle.[16] The regulations state that the on-road driving time must be no less than 30 minutes.[21] If at any point during the test, the examiner has to intervene with any controls, this will usually result in failure and could be marked on the test report as a dangerous fault.

Independent driving[edit]
The test includes a 10-minute section of independent driving. It is included in the following practical driving tests:

car
motorcycle module two
large goods vehicle (LGV)
passenger carrying vehicle (PCV) tests
approved driving instructor (ADI) driving ability (sometimes called ‘part two’)
taxi
During the independent driving section, candidates have to drive by:

following traffic signs to a destination, or
following a series of verbal instructions, or
following a combination of both.
To help candidates understand where they are to go, the examiner may show them a route diagram. It does not matter if candidates do not remember every direction, nor if they deviate from the intended route unless they commit a driving fault.

If there are poor or obscured traffic signs, the examiner will give the candidate directions until they can see the next traffic sign. Candidates will not need to have a detailed knowledge of the area, but will not be allowed to use Automotive navigation system for this part of the test.

If the candidate has special needs, the examiner will be able to make reasonable adjustments. For the independent driving section, this could be asking the candidate which method they prefer – following signs, or a series of directions (a maximum of three) [22]

As of 4th December 2017

The U.K driving test will change, all the relevant changes can be found here driving test or read this article [23]on the new changes being made.

DVSA, Yeading LGV (London),Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency,Driving Test Centre Yeading LGV,Willow Tree Lane,Yeading,,UB4 9BS

📞 We can forward your call to DVSA Now

Calls to 084 numbers cost 7ppm plus network charges. We are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned on this page. Looking for your local DVSA Driving Test Centre? Here’s everything you need to know:

Address:
DVSA Driving Test Centre, Yeading LGV (London),Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency,Driving Test Centre Yeading LGV,Willow Tree Lane,Yeading,,UB4 9BS


Opening hours:
Most Driving test Centres are open from 8am to 7pm on weekdays, 8am – 2pm on Saturdays and are closed on Sundays. We have been unable to determine whether this is the case for this centre.

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVSA Driving Test Centre, Yeading LGV (London),Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency,Driving Test Centre Yeading LGV,Willow Tree Lane,Yeading,,UB4 9BS (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
Driving Test Booking (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8930
VOSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7344
Car Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 2173
Driving Licence (general) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8928
DVLA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 507 7920
Road Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2576
Personalised Registration Plates (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8922
Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0226
Provisional Licence (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8927
Theory Test (bookings) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8924
Medical Issues (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7271
V5C and Log Books (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075
Driver Check Service (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075

About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About UK Driving Tests
from Wikipedia

The United Kingdom driving test is a test of competence that UK residents take in order to obtain a full Great Britain or Northern Ireland (car) driving licence or to add additional full entitlements to an existing one.[1] Tests vary depending on the class of vehicle to be driven. In Great Britain it is administered by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA)[2] and in Northern Ireland by the Driver & Vehicle Agency (DVA).[3]

The minimum age at which one can take a UK driving test is currently 16 for mopeds and 17 for cars (16 for those on the higher/enhanced rate of the mobility component of DLA or PIP[4]). There is no upper age limit. In addition to a driving licence, a CBT certificate may be required before a moped or motorcycle is ridden.[5]

In GB around 1.6 million people sit the practical car test per year, with a pass rate of around 43%.[6] The theory test has a pass rate of around 51.6%.[7]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 The current test
2.1 Theory test
2.1.1 Multiple-choice test
2.1.2 Hazard perception
2.2 Practical test
2.2.1 Format
2.2.2 Eyesight test
2.2.3 Vehicle safety questions
2.2.4 Controlled stop
2.2.5 Manoeuvres
2.2.6 General driving
2.2.7 Independent driving
3 See also
4 References
5 External links
History[edit]
UK driving licences were introduced by the Motor Car Act 1903 but no test was required.[8]

A test for disabled drivers was introduced by the Road Traffic Act 1930.[9]

Legislation for compulsory testing was introduced for all new drivers with the Road Traffic Act 1934. The test was initially voluntary to avoid a rush of candidates until 1 June 1935 when all people who had started to drive on or after 1 April 1934 needed to have passed the test.[9]

Testing was suspended during World War II,[9] and was suspended again during the Suez Crisis in 1956 to allow examiners help to administer petrol rations.[9]

The driving theory test was introduced in July 1996 as a written examination, which was updated to computerised format in 2000.[9]

The hazard perception segment of the theory test, was introduced in November 2002.

In January 2015, new CGI clips replaced the real-life video clips in the Hazard Perception Test.[10]

The current test[edit]
Currently, there are two tests (for a car licence) that need to be passed in order to obtain a full driving licence. First the theory test and then, within two years of passing this, the practical test.

Theory test[edit]
The theory test is made up of two parts, both of which differ according to the type of vehicle licence the candidate is pursuing:

Multiple-choice test
Hazard perception test
Both parts must be passed in order to obtain a theory test pass certificate. This enables the candidate to book a practical driving test.[6] Candidates have two years from the date that they passed the first part of their theory test to take their practical test, or they will have to pass both parts of the theory test once again before they can book a practical test.

Multiple-choice test[edit]
This part of the theory test is performed on a computer system. The test has 50 multiple choice questions and the candidate must answer at least 43 of them correctly to pass.[11] All questions are randomly selected from a bank of just under one thousand on a selection of topics.

The test lasts for 57 minutes although candidates with certain special needs can apply for more time.[12] All 50 questions must be answered. The test allows 15 minutes practice time at the start of the exam to get used to answering the questions and how to use the system. To answer a question the candidate simply touches their choice of answer from the listed answers on the computer screen. If a mistake is made the candidate can deselect a choice and reselect a different option. The candidate is allowed to go back to a question at any time and can also flag questions they are unsure of in order to find and return to it quickly and easily later.[11] To pass the test, 43 of the 50 questions (86%) must be answered correctly.[6]

For lorry and bus drivers, 100 questions are asked over a 115-minute period, and 85 out of 100 must be answered correctly to pass.

Prior to 3 September 2007, the car and motorcycle multiple-choice tests comprised 35 questions, with a pass mark of 30 within a 40-minute time limit.

Hazard perception[edit]
Main article: Hazard Perception Test
Candidates watch fourteen one-minute clips (nineteen clips for lorry and bus candidates) filmed from the perspective of a car driver or motorcyclist and have to indicate, usually by clicking a mouse button or touching the screen, when they observe a developing hazard.[13]

Practical test[edit]
Unless one is converting a foreign licence, it is necessary to have passed both components of the theory test before sitting this exam.[14] Passing the practical test then entitles one to hold a full UK driving licence.[1]

The test candidate must produce their provisional licence for the examiner before the test starts.

The practical car test can be taken in either a manual or an automatic car; if the test is passed in an automatic car, then the full licence granted will be restricted to automatic cars only.

The practical motorcycle test is split into two separate modules – the off-road module and the on-road module. To get a full motorcycle licence, the candidate needs to pass both modules. The target waiting time for a practical driving test is six weeks. However, in practice the waiting time can be considerably longer.[15]

DSA Form DL25C: Driving Test Report issued NG5 to candidates by examiners
Format[edit]
The practical car test is taken on the road, with a professionally trained DVSA examiner directing the candidate around a pre-determined route. The examiner marks the candidate for driving faults, serious faults, and dangerous faults. A candidate will fail the test if he or she accumulates any serious or dangerous faults, or more than fifteen driving faults. If a candidate accumulates several driving faults in the same category, the examiner may consider the fault habitual and mark a serious fault in that category. The test usually lasts 38 to 40 minutes in a standard test, or approximately 70 minutes when the candidate is taking an extended test after having had their licence revoked.[16]

Eyesight test[edit]
Before getting to the car, the examiner will ask the candidate to read a car’s number plate at a distance. The distance required is 20.5 metres for an old-style plate (A123 ABC) and 20 metres for a new style plate (AB51 ABC).[17] If the candidate needs glasses to do this, then they must be worn during the test. If the candidate fails to read the first number plate correctly, then the examiner asks the candidate to read a second number plate. If the candidate cannot correctly read the second number plate, then the examiner must use a tape measure to measure the correct distance between the candidate and a third number plate. If the candidate cannot read the third number plate, then the candidate is deemed to have failed and the test will not continue.

Vehicle safety questions[edit]
Before the candidate is taken out onto the road, the examiner asks two questions about car maintenance and safety. These are phrased in the form “Show me…” and “Tell me…”; as such, this component of the test is often known as “Show me, tell me”. For example:

Show me how you would check that the power assisted steering is working before starting a journey.
Open the bonnet, identify where you would check the engine oil level and tell me how you would check that the engine has sufficient oil.
A failure to answer one or both of these questions correctly would result in a driving fault being marked against the candidate. The questions that may be asked are changed from time to time. From July 2008, there are 19 different questions which can be asked in 13 different combinations.[18]

Controlled stop[edit]
The controlled stop, more commonly referred to as the “emergency stop”, is an exercise which determines the ability of the candidate to stop the vehicle promptly yet under control during a simulated emergency. The simulation is performed by the examiner raising his or her hand and saying, “STOP!”. A controlled stop exercise will be carried out on every extended test and one third of normal tests. This might be an emergency stop, or the candidate might be asked to make a controlled stop in a specific location.[16] During dangerous weather conditions, such as rain and snow, this test can be left out for safety reasons.

Manoeuvres[edit]
During the test, the examiner will ask the candidate to carry out one manoeuvre from the following list:[19]

Turn in the road, colloquially known as a “3 point turn”, although more than 3 moves may be necessary.
Reverse around a corner
Reverse park into a parking space either parallel to the kerb (on road), or oblique or right-angle (in a marked bay in an off-road car park)
This change from two manoeuvres to one was introduced to allow time for the independent driving section of the test that was introduced on 4 October 2010.

Manoeuvres are selected at random by the examiner depending on the route chosen and conditions on the route.

General driving[edit]
Generally, the candidate must demonstrate an ability to drive in various road and traffic conditions [20] and react appropriately in actual risk situations.[19] The conditions typically encountered on test include driving in urban areas as well as higher speed limit roads where possible; this includes dual carriageways but not motorways as motorways in Britain can only be used by full licence holders. The object of the test is to ensure that the candidate is well grounded in the basic principles of safe driving, and is sufficiently practised in them to be able to show, at the time of the test, that they are a competent and considerate driver and are not a source of danger to themselves or to other road users. The drive will include two or three normal stops at (and moving away from) the side of the road on level roads as well as on gradients, in addition to a demonstration of moving away from behind a stationary vehicle.[16] The regulations state that the on-road driving time must be no less than 30 minutes.[21] If at any point during the test, the examiner has to intervene with any controls, this will usually result in failure and could be marked on the test report as a dangerous fault.

Independent driving[edit]
The test includes a 10-minute section of independent driving. It is included in the following practical driving tests:

car
motorcycle module two
large goods vehicle (LGV)
passenger carrying vehicle (PCV) tests
approved driving instructor (ADI) driving ability (sometimes called ‘part two’)
taxi
During the independent driving section, candidates have to drive by:

following traffic signs to a destination, or
following a series of verbal instructions, or
following a combination of both.
To help candidates understand where they are to go, the examiner may show them a route diagram. It does not matter if candidates do not remember every direction, nor if they deviate from the intended route unless they commit a driving fault.

If there are poor or obscured traffic signs, the examiner will give the candidate directions until they can see the next traffic sign. Candidates will not need to have a detailed knowledge of the area, but will not be allowed to use Automotive navigation system for this part of the test.

If the candidate has special needs, the examiner will be able to make reasonable adjustments. For the independent driving section, this could be asking the candidate which method they prefer – following signs, or a series of directions (a maximum of three) [22]

As of 4th December 2017

The U.K driving test will change, all the relevant changes can be found here driving test or read this article [23]on the new changes being made.

DVSA, Worksop,Driving Test Centre Worksop,”Unit 4, The Point”,Coach Road,Shireoaks,,S81 8BW

📞 We can forward your call to DVSA Now

Calls to 084 numbers cost 7ppm plus network charges. We are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned on this page. Looking for your local DVSA Driving Test Centre? Here’s everything you need to know:

Address:
DVSA Driving Test Centre, Worksop,Driving Test Centre Worksop,”Unit 4, The Point”,Coach Road,Shireoaks,,S81 8BW


Opening hours:
Most Driving test Centres are open from 8am to 7pm on weekdays, 8am – 2pm on Saturdays and are closed on Sundays. We have been unable to determine whether this is the case for this centre.

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVSA Driving Test Centre, Worksop,Driving Test Centre Worksop,”Unit 4, The Point”,Coach Road,Shireoaks,,S81 8BW (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
Driving Test Booking (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8930
VOSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7344
Car Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 2173
Driving Licence (general) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8928
DVLA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 507 7920
Road Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2576
Personalised Registration Plates (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8922
Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0226
Provisional Licence (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8927
Theory Test (bookings) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8924
Medical Issues (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7271
V5C and Log Books (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075
Driver Check Service (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075

About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About UK Driving Tests
from Wikipedia

The United Kingdom driving test is a test of competence that UK residents take in order to obtain a full Great Britain or Northern Ireland (car) driving licence or to add additional full entitlements to an existing one.[1] Tests vary depending on the class of vehicle to be driven. In Great Britain it is administered by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA)[2] and in Northern Ireland by the Driver & Vehicle Agency (DVA).[3]

The minimum age at which one can take a UK driving test is currently 16 for mopeds and 17 for cars (16 for those on the higher/enhanced rate of the mobility component of DLA or PIP[4]). There is no upper age limit. In addition to a driving licence, a CBT certificate may be required before a moped or motorcycle is ridden.[5]

In GB around 1.6 million people sit the practical car test per year, with a pass rate of around 43%.[6] The theory test has a pass rate of around 51.6%.[7]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 The current test
2.1 Theory test
2.1.1 Multiple-choice test
2.1.2 Hazard perception
2.2 Practical test
2.2.1 Format
2.2.2 Eyesight test
2.2.3 Vehicle safety questions
2.2.4 Controlled stop
2.2.5 Manoeuvres
2.2.6 General driving
2.2.7 Independent driving
3 See also
4 References
5 External links
History[edit]
UK driving licences were introduced by the Motor Car Act 1903 but no test was required.[8]

A test for disabled drivers was introduced by the Road Traffic Act 1930.[9]

Legislation for compulsory testing was introduced for all new drivers with the Road Traffic Act 1934. The test was initially voluntary to avoid a rush of candidates until 1 June 1935 when all people who had started to drive on or after 1 April 1934 needed to have passed the test.[9]

Testing was suspended during World War II,[9] and was suspended again during the Suez Crisis in 1956 to allow examiners help to administer petrol rations.[9]

The driving theory test was introduced in July 1996 as a written examination, which was updated to computerised format in 2000.[9]

The hazard perception segment of the theory test, was introduced in November 2002.

In January 2015, new CGI clips replaced the real-life video clips in the Hazard Perception Test.[10]

The current test[edit]
Currently, there are two tests (for a car licence) that need to be passed in order to obtain a full driving licence. First the theory test and then, within two years of passing this, the practical test.

Theory test[edit]
The theory test is made up of two parts, both of which differ according to the type of vehicle licence the candidate is pursuing:

Multiple-choice test
Hazard perception test
Both parts must be passed in order to obtain a theory test pass certificate. This enables the candidate to book a practical driving test.[6] Candidates have two years from the date that they passed the first part of their theory test to take their practical test, or they will have to pass both parts of the theory test once again before they can book a practical test.

Multiple-choice test[edit]
This part of the theory test is performed on a computer system. The test has 50 multiple choice questions and the candidate must answer at least 43 of them correctly to pass.[11] All questions are randomly selected from a bank of just under one thousand on a selection of topics.

The test lasts for 57 minutes although candidates with certain special needs can apply for more time.[12] All 50 questions must be answered. The test allows 15 minutes practice time at the start of the exam to get used to answering the questions and how to use the system. To answer a question the candidate simply touches their choice of answer from the listed answers on the computer screen. If a mistake is made the candidate can deselect a choice and reselect a different option. The candidate is allowed to go back to a question at any time and can also flag questions they are unsure of in order to find and return to it quickly and easily later.[11] To pass the test, 43 of the 50 questions (86%) must be answered correctly.[6]

For lorry and bus drivers, 100 questions are asked over a 115-minute period, and 85 out of 100 must be answered correctly to pass.

Prior to 3 September 2007, the car and motorcycle multiple-choice tests comprised 35 questions, with a pass mark of 30 within a 40-minute time limit.

Hazard perception[edit]
Main article: Hazard Perception Test
Candidates watch fourteen one-minute clips (nineteen clips for lorry and bus candidates) filmed from the perspective of a car driver or motorcyclist and have to indicate, usually by clicking a mouse button or touching the screen, when they observe a developing hazard.[13]

Practical test[edit]
Unless one is converting a foreign licence, it is necessary to have passed both components of the theory test before sitting this exam.[14] Passing the practical test then entitles one to hold a full UK driving licence.[1]

The test candidate must produce their provisional licence for the examiner before the test starts.

The practical car test can be taken in either a manual or an automatic car; if the test is passed in an automatic car, then the full licence granted will be restricted to automatic cars only.

The practical motorcycle test is split into two separate modules – the off-road module and the on-road module. To get a full motorcycle licence, the candidate needs to pass both modules. The target waiting time for a practical driving test is six weeks. However, in practice the waiting time can be considerably longer.[15]

DSA Form DL25C: Driving Test Report issued NG5 to candidates by examiners
Format[edit]
The practical car test is taken on the road, with a professionally trained DVSA examiner directing the candidate around a pre-determined route. The examiner marks the candidate for driving faults, serious faults, and dangerous faults. A candidate will fail the test if he or she accumulates any serious or dangerous faults, or more than fifteen driving faults. If a candidate accumulates several driving faults in the same category, the examiner may consider the fault habitual and mark a serious fault in that category. The test usually lasts 38 to 40 minutes in a standard test, or approximately 70 minutes when the candidate is taking an extended test after having had their licence revoked.[16]

Eyesight test[edit]
Before getting to the car, the examiner will ask the candidate to read a car’s number plate at a distance. The distance required is 20.5 metres for an old-style plate (A123 ABC) and 20 metres for a new style plate (AB51 ABC).[17] If the candidate needs glasses to do this, then they must be worn during the test. If the candidate fails to read the first number plate correctly, then the examiner asks the candidate to read a second number plate. If the candidate cannot correctly read the second number plate, then the examiner must use a tape measure to measure the correct distance between the candidate and a third number plate. If the candidate cannot read the third number plate, then the candidate is deemed to have failed and the test will not continue.

Vehicle safety questions[edit]
Before the candidate is taken out onto the road, the examiner asks two questions about car maintenance and safety. These are phrased in the form “Show me…” and “Tell me…”; as such, this component of the test is often known as “Show me, tell me”. For example:

Show me how you would check that the power assisted steering is working before starting a journey.
Open the bonnet, identify where you would check the engine oil level and tell me how you would check that the engine has sufficient oil.
A failure to answer one or both of these questions correctly would result in a driving fault being marked against the candidate. The questions that may be asked are changed from time to time. From July 2008, there are 19 different questions which can be asked in 13 different combinations.[18]

Controlled stop[edit]
The controlled stop, more commonly referred to as the “emergency stop”, is an exercise which determines the ability of the candidate to stop the vehicle promptly yet under control during a simulated emergency. The simulation is performed by the examiner raising his or her hand and saying, “STOP!”. A controlled stop exercise will be carried out on every extended test and one third of normal tests. This might be an emergency stop, or the candidate might be asked to make a controlled stop in a specific location.[16] During dangerous weather conditions, such as rain and snow, this test can be left out for safety reasons.

Manoeuvres[edit]
During the test, the examiner will ask the candidate to carry out one manoeuvre from the following list:[19]

Turn in the road, colloquially known as a “3 point turn”, although more than 3 moves may be necessary.
Reverse around a corner
Reverse park into a parking space either parallel to the kerb (on road), or oblique or right-angle (in a marked bay in an off-road car park)
This change from two manoeuvres to one was introduced to allow time for the independent driving section of the test that was introduced on 4 October 2010.

Manoeuvres are selected at random by the examiner depending on the route chosen and conditions on the route.

General driving[edit]
Generally, the candidate must demonstrate an ability to drive in various road and traffic conditions [20] and react appropriately in actual risk situations.[19] The conditions typically encountered on test include driving in urban areas as well as higher speed limit roads where possible; this includes dual carriageways but not motorways as motorways in Britain can only be used by full licence holders. The object of the test is to ensure that the candidate is well grounded in the basic principles of safe driving, and is sufficiently practised in them to be able to show, at the time of the test, that they are a competent and considerate driver and are not a source of danger to themselves or to other road users. The drive will include two or three normal stops at (and moving away from) the side of the road on level roads as well as on gradients, in addition to a demonstration of moving away from behind a stationary vehicle.[16] The regulations state that the on-road driving time must be no less than 30 minutes.[21] If at any point during the test, the examiner has to intervene with any controls, this will usually result in failure and could be marked on the test report as a dangerous fault.

Independent driving[edit]
The test includes a 10-minute section of independent driving. It is included in the following practical driving tests:

car
motorcycle module two
large goods vehicle (LGV)
passenger carrying vehicle (PCV) tests
approved driving instructor (ADI) driving ability (sometimes called ‘part two’)
taxi
During the independent driving section, candidates have to drive by:

following traffic signs to a destination, or
following a series of verbal instructions, or
following a combination of both.
To help candidates understand where they are to go, the examiner may show them a route diagram. It does not matter if candidates do not remember every direction, nor if they deviate from the intended route unless they commit a driving fault.

If there are poor or obscured traffic signs, the examiner will give the candidate directions until they can see the next traffic sign. Candidates will not need to have a detailed knowledge of the area, but will not be allowed to use Automotive navigation system for this part of the test.

If the candidate has special needs, the examiner will be able to make reasonable adjustments. For the independent driving section, this could be asking the candidate which method they prefer – following signs, or a series of directions (a maximum of three) [22]

As of 4th December 2017

The U.K driving test will change, all the relevant changes can be found here driving test or read this article [23]on the new changes being made.

DVSA, Wood Green (London),Wood Green Crown Court,Lordship Lane,,LONDON,,N22 5LF

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Address:
DVSA Driving Test Centre, Wood Green (London),Wood Green Crown Court,Lordship Lane,,LONDON,,N22 5LF


Opening hours:
Most Driving test Centres are open from 8am to 7pm on weekdays, 8am – 2pm on Saturdays and are closed on Sundays. We have been unable to determine whether this is the case for this centre.

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVSA Driving Test Centre, Wood Green (London),Wood Green Crown Court,Lordship Lane,,LONDON,,N22 5LF (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
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0843 902 8930
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0843 504 7344
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About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About UK Driving Tests
from Wikipedia

The United Kingdom driving test is a test of competence that UK residents take in order to obtain a full Great Britain or Northern Ireland (car) driving licence or to add additional full entitlements to an existing one.[1] Tests vary depending on the class of vehicle to be driven. In Great Britain it is administered by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA)[2] and in Northern Ireland by the Driver & Vehicle Agency (DVA).[3]

The minimum age at which one can take a UK driving test is currently 16 for mopeds and 17 for cars (16 for those on the higher/enhanced rate of the mobility component of DLA or PIP[4]). There is no upper age limit. In addition to a driving licence, a CBT certificate may be required before a moped or motorcycle is ridden.[5]

In GB around 1.6 million people sit the practical car test per year, with a pass rate of around 43%.[6] The theory test has a pass rate of around 51.6%.[7]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 The current test
2.1 Theory test
2.1.1 Multiple-choice test
2.1.2 Hazard perception
2.2 Practical test
2.2.1 Format
2.2.2 Eyesight test
2.2.3 Vehicle safety questions
2.2.4 Controlled stop
2.2.5 Manoeuvres
2.2.6 General driving
2.2.7 Independent driving
3 See also
4 References
5 External links
History[edit]
UK driving licences were introduced by the Motor Car Act 1903 but no test was required.[8]

A test for disabled drivers was introduced by the Road Traffic Act 1930.[9]

Legislation for compulsory testing was introduced for all new drivers with the Road Traffic Act 1934. The test was initially voluntary to avoid a rush of candidates until 1 June 1935 when all people who had started to drive on or after 1 April 1934 needed to have passed the test.[9]

Testing was suspended during World War II,[9] and was suspended again during the Suez Crisis in 1956 to allow examiners help to administer petrol rations.[9]

The driving theory test was introduced in July 1996 as a written examination, which was updated to computerised format in 2000.[9]

The hazard perception segment of the theory test, was introduced in November 2002.

In January 2015, new CGI clips replaced the real-life video clips in the Hazard Perception Test.[10]

The current test[edit]
Currently, there are two tests (for a car licence) that need to be passed in order to obtain a full driving licence. First the theory test and then, within two years of passing this, the practical test.

Theory test[edit]
The theory test is made up of two parts, both of which differ according to the type of vehicle licence the candidate is pursuing:

Multiple-choice test
Hazard perception test
Both parts must be passed in order to obtain a theory test pass certificate. This enables the candidate to book a practical driving test.[6] Candidates have two years from the date that they passed the first part of their theory test to take their practical test, or they will have to pass both parts of the theory test once again before they can book a practical test.

Multiple-choice test[edit]
This part of the theory test is performed on a computer system. The test has 50 multiple choice questions and the candidate must answer at least 43 of them correctly to pass.[11] All questions are randomly selected from a bank of just under one thousand on a selection of topics.

The test lasts for 57 minutes although candidates with certain special needs can apply for more time.[12] All 50 questions must be answered. The test allows 15 minutes practice time at the start of the exam to get used to answering the questions and how to use the system. To answer a question the candidate simply touches their choice of answer from the listed answers on the computer screen. If a mistake is made the candidate can deselect a choice and reselect a different option. The candidate is allowed to go back to a question at any time and can also flag questions they are unsure of in order to find and return to it quickly and easily later.[11] To pass the test, 43 of the 50 questions (86%) must be answered correctly.[6]

For lorry and bus drivers, 100 questions are asked over a 115-minute period, and 85 out of 100 must be answered correctly to pass.

Prior to 3 September 2007, the car and motorcycle multiple-choice tests comprised 35 questions, with a pass mark of 30 within a 40-minute time limit.

Hazard perception[edit]
Main article: Hazard Perception Test
Candidates watch fourteen one-minute clips (nineteen clips for lorry and bus candidates) filmed from the perspective of a car driver or motorcyclist and have to indicate, usually by clicking a mouse button or touching the screen, when they observe a developing hazard.[13]

Practical test[edit]
Unless one is converting a foreign licence, it is necessary to have passed both components of the theory test before sitting this exam.[14] Passing the practical test then entitles one to hold a full UK driving licence.[1]

The test candidate must produce their provisional licence for the examiner before the test starts.

The practical car test can be taken in either a manual or an automatic car; if the test is passed in an automatic car, then the full licence granted will be restricted to automatic cars only.

The practical motorcycle test is split into two separate modules – the off-road module and the on-road module. To get a full motorcycle licence, the candidate needs to pass both modules. The target waiting time for a practical driving test is six weeks. However, in practice the waiting time can be considerably longer.[15]

DSA Form DL25C: Driving Test Report issued NG5 to candidates by examiners
Format[edit]
The practical car test is taken on the road, with a professionally trained DVSA examiner directing the candidate around a pre-determined route. The examiner marks the candidate for driving faults, serious faults, and dangerous faults. A candidate will fail the test if he or she accumulates any serious or dangerous faults, or more than fifteen driving faults. If a candidate accumulates several driving faults in the same category, the examiner may consider the fault habitual and mark a serious fault in that category. The test usually lasts 38 to 40 minutes in a standard test, or approximately 70 minutes when the candidate is taking an extended test after having had their licence revoked.[16]

Eyesight test[edit]
Before getting to the car, the examiner will ask the candidate to read a car’s number plate at a distance. The distance required is 20.5 metres for an old-style plate (A123 ABC) and 20 metres for a new style plate (AB51 ABC).[17] If the candidate needs glasses to do this, then they must be worn during the test. If the candidate fails to read the first number plate correctly, then the examiner asks the candidate to read a second number plate. If the candidate cannot correctly read the second number plate, then the examiner must use a tape measure to measure the correct distance between the candidate and a third number plate. If the candidate cannot read the third number plate, then the candidate is deemed to have failed and the test will not continue.

Vehicle safety questions[edit]
Before the candidate is taken out onto the road, the examiner asks two questions about car maintenance and safety. These are phrased in the form “Show me…” and “Tell me…”; as such, this component of the test is often known as “Show me, tell me”. For example:

Show me how you would check that the power assisted steering is working before starting a journey.
Open the bonnet, identify where you would check the engine oil level and tell me how you would check that the engine has sufficient oil.
A failure to answer one or both of these questions correctly would result in a driving fault being marked against the candidate. The questions that may be asked are changed from time to time. From July 2008, there are 19 different questions which can be asked in 13 different combinations.[18]

Controlled stop[edit]
The controlled stop, more commonly referred to as the “emergency stop”, is an exercise which determines the ability of the candidate to stop the vehicle promptly yet under control during a simulated emergency. The simulation is performed by the examiner raising his or her hand and saying, “STOP!”. A controlled stop exercise will be carried out on every extended test and one third of normal tests. This might be an emergency stop, or the candidate might be asked to make a controlled stop in a specific location.[16] During dangerous weather conditions, such as rain and snow, this test can be left out for safety reasons.

Manoeuvres[edit]
During the test, the examiner will ask the candidate to carry out one manoeuvre from the following list:[19]

Turn in the road, colloquially known as a “3 point turn”, although more than 3 moves may be necessary.
Reverse around a corner
Reverse park into a parking space either parallel to the kerb (on road), or oblique or right-angle (in a marked bay in an off-road car park)
This change from two manoeuvres to one was introduced to allow time for the independent driving section of the test that was introduced on 4 October 2010.

Manoeuvres are selected at random by the examiner depending on the route chosen and conditions on the route.

General driving[edit]
Generally, the candidate must demonstrate an ability to drive in various road and traffic conditions [20] and react appropriately in actual risk situations.[19] The conditions typically encountered on test include driving in urban areas as well as higher speed limit roads where possible; this includes dual carriageways but not motorways as motorways in Britain can only be used by full licence holders. The object of the test is to ensure that the candidate is well grounded in the basic principles of safe driving, and is sufficiently practised in them to be able to show, at the time of the test, that they are a competent and considerate driver and are not a source of danger to themselves or to other road users. The drive will include two or three normal stops at (and moving away from) the side of the road on level roads as well as on gradients, in addition to a demonstration of moving away from behind a stationary vehicle.[16] The regulations state that the on-road driving time must be no less than 30 minutes.[21] If at any point during the test, the examiner has to intervene with any controls, this will usually result in failure and could be marked on the test report as a dangerous fault.

Independent driving[edit]
The test includes a 10-minute section of independent driving. It is included in the following practical driving tests:

car
motorcycle module two
large goods vehicle (LGV)
passenger carrying vehicle (PCV) tests
approved driving instructor (ADI) driving ability (sometimes called ‘part two’)
taxi
During the independent driving section, candidates have to drive by:

following traffic signs to a destination, or
following a series of verbal instructions, or
following a combination of both.
To help candidates understand where they are to go, the examiner may show them a route diagram. It does not matter if candidates do not remember every direction, nor if they deviate from the intended route unless they commit a driving fault.

If there are poor or obscured traffic signs, the examiner will give the candidate directions until they can see the next traffic sign. Candidates will not need to have a detailed knowledge of the area, but will not be allowed to use Automotive navigation system for this part of the test.

If the candidate has special needs, the examiner will be able to make reasonable adjustments. For the independent driving section, this could be asking the candidate which method they prefer – following signs, or a series of directions (a maximum of three) [22]

As of 4th December 2017

The U.K driving test will change, all the relevant changes can be found here driving test or read this article [23]on the new changes being made.

DVSA, Worcester,Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency,Driving Test Centre Worcester,Stanier Road,Warndon,,WR4 9FE

📞 We can forward your call to DVSA Now

Calls to 084 numbers cost 7ppm plus network charges. We are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned on this page. Looking for your local DVSA Driving Test Centre? Here’s everything you need to know:

Address:
DVSA Driving Test Centre, Worcester,Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency,Driving Test Centre Worcester,Stanier Road,Warndon,,WR4 9FE


Opening hours:
Most Driving test Centres are open from 8am to 7pm on weekdays, 8am – 2pm on Saturdays and are closed on Sundays. We have been unable to determine whether this is the case for this centre.

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVSA Driving Test Centre, Worcester,Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency,Driving Test Centre Worcester,Stanier Road,Warndon,,WR4 9FE (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
Driving Test Booking (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8930
VOSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7344
Car Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 2173
Driving Licence (general) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8928
DVLA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 507 7920
Road Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2576
Personalised Registration Plates (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8922
Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0226
Provisional Licence (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8927
Theory Test (bookings) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8924
Medical Issues (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7271
V5C and Log Books (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075
Driver Check Service (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075

About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About UK Driving Tests
from Wikipedia

The United Kingdom driving test is a test of competence that UK residents take in order to obtain a full Great Britain or Northern Ireland (car) driving licence or to add additional full entitlements to an existing one.[1] Tests vary depending on the class of vehicle to be driven. In Great Britain it is administered by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA)[2] and in Northern Ireland by the Driver & Vehicle Agency (DVA).[3]

The minimum age at which one can take a UK driving test is currently 16 for mopeds and 17 for cars (16 for those on the higher/enhanced rate of the mobility component of DLA or PIP[4]). There is no upper age limit. In addition to a driving licence, a CBT certificate may be required before a moped or motorcycle is ridden.[5]

In GB around 1.6 million people sit the practical car test per year, with a pass rate of around 43%.[6] The theory test has a pass rate of around 51.6%.[7]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 The current test
2.1 Theory test
2.1.1 Multiple-choice test
2.1.2 Hazard perception
2.2 Practical test
2.2.1 Format
2.2.2 Eyesight test
2.2.3 Vehicle safety questions
2.2.4 Controlled stop
2.2.5 Manoeuvres
2.2.6 General driving
2.2.7 Independent driving
3 See also
4 References
5 External links
History[edit]
UK driving licences were introduced by the Motor Car Act 1903 but no test was required.[8]

A test for disabled drivers was introduced by the Road Traffic Act 1930.[9]

Legislation for compulsory testing was introduced for all new drivers with the Road Traffic Act 1934. The test was initially voluntary to avoid a rush of candidates until 1 June 1935 when all people who had started to drive on or after 1 April 1934 needed to have passed the test.[9]

Testing was suspended during World War II,[9] and was suspended again during the Suez Crisis in 1956 to allow examiners help to administer petrol rations.[9]

The driving theory test was introduced in July 1996 as a written examination, which was updated to computerised format in 2000.[9]

The hazard perception segment of the theory test, was introduced in November 2002.

In January 2015, new CGI clips replaced the real-life video clips in the Hazard Perception Test.[10]

The current test[edit]
Currently, there are two tests (for a car licence) that need to be passed in order to obtain a full driving licence. First the theory test and then, within two years of passing this, the practical test.

Theory test[edit]
The theory test is made up of two parts, both of which differ according to the type of vehicle licence the candidate is pursuing:

Multiple-choice test
Hazard perception test
Both parts must be passed in order to obtain a theory test pass certificate. This enables the candidate to book a practical driving test.[6] Candidates have two years from the date that they passed the first part of their theory test to take their practical test, or they will have to pass both parts of the theory test once again before they can book a practical test.

Multiple-choice test[edit]
This part of the theory test is performed on a computer system. The test has 50 multiple choice questions and the candidate must answer at least 43 of them correctly to pass.[11] All questions are randomly selected from a bank of just under one thousand on a selection of topics.

The test lasts for 57 minutes although candidates with certain special needs can apply for more time.[12] All 50 questions must be answered. The test allows 15 minutes practice time at the start of the exam to get used to answering the questions and how to use the system. To answer a question the candidate simply touches their choice of answer from the listed answers on the computer screen. If a mistake is made the candidate can deselect a choice and reselect a different option. The candidate is allowed to go back to a question at any time and can also flag questions they are unsure of in order to find and return to it quickly and easily later.[11] To pass the test, 43 of the 50 questions (86%) must be answered correctly.[6]

For lorry and bus drivers, 100 questions are asked over a 115-minute period, and 85 out of 100 must be answered correctly to pass.

Prior to 3 September 2007, the car and motorcycle multiple-choice tests comprised 35 questions, with a pass mark of 30 within a 40-minute time limit.

Hazard perception[edit]
Main article: Hazard Perception Test
Candidates watch fourteen one-minute clips (nineteen clips for lorry and bus candidates) filmed from the perspective of a car driver or motorcyclist and have to indicate, usually by clicking a mouse button or touching the screen, when they observe a developing hazard.[13]

Practical test[edit]
Unless one is converting a foreign licence, it is necessary to have passed both components of the theory test before sitting this exam.[14] Passing the practical test then entitles one to hold a full UK driving licence.[1]

The test candidate must produce their provisional licence for the examiner before the test starts.

The practical car test can be taken in either a manual or an automatic car; if the test is passed in an automatic car, then the full licence granted will be restricted to automatic cars only.

The practical motorcycle test is split into two separate modules – the off-road module and the on-road module. To get a full motorcycle licence, the candidate needs to pass both modules. The target waiting time for a practical driving test is six weeks. However, in practice the waiting time can be considerably longer.[15]

DSA Form DL25C: Driving Test Report issued NG5 to candidates by examiners
Format[edit]
The practical car test is taken on the road, with a professionally trained DVSA examiner directing the candidate around a pre-determined route. The examiner marks the candidate for driving faults, serious faults, and dangerous faults. A candidate will fail the test if he or she accumulates any serious or dangerous faults, or more than fifteen driving faults. If a candidate accumulates several driving faults in the same category, the examiner may consider the fault habitual and mark a serious fault in that category. The test usually lasts 38 to 40 minutes in a standard test, or approximately 70 minutes when the candidate is taking an extended test after having had their licence revoked.[16]

Eyesight test[edit]
Before getting to the car, the examiner will ask the candidate to read a car’s number plate at a distance. The distance required is 20.5 metres for an old-style plate (A123 ABC) and 20 metres for a new style plate (AB51 ABC).[17] If the candidate needs glasses to do this, then they must be worn during the test. If the candidate fails to read the first number plate correctly, then the examiner asks the candidate to read a second number plate. If the candidate cannot correctly read the second number plate, then the examiner must use a tape measure to measure the correct distance between the candidate and a third number plate. If the candidate cannot read the third number plate, then the candidate is deemed to have failed and the test will not continue.

Vehicle safety questions[edit]
Before the candidate is taken out onto the road, the examiner asks two questions about car maintenance and safety. These are phrased in the form “Show me…” and “Tell me…”; as such, this component of the test is often known as “Show me, tell me”. For example:

Show me how you would check that the power assisted steering is working before starting a journey.
Open the bonnet, identify where you would check the engine oil level and tell me how you would check that the engine has sufficient oil.
A failure to answer one or both of these questions correctly would result in a driving fault being marked against the candidate. The questions that may be asked are changed from time to time. From July 2008, there are 19 different questions which can be asked in 13 different combinations.[18]

Controlled stop[edit]
The controlled stop, more commonly referred to as the “emergency stop”, is an exercise which determines the ability of the candidate to stop the vehicle promptly yet under control during a simulated emergency. The simulation is performed by the examiner raising his or her hand and saying, “STOP!”. A controlled stop exercise will be carried out on every extended test and one third of normal tests. This might be an emergency stop, or the candidate might be asked to make a controlled stop in a specific location.[16] During dangerous weather conditions, such as rain and snow, this test can be left out for safety reasons.

Manoeuvres[edit]
During the test, the examiner will ask the candidate to carry out one manoeuvre from the following list:[19]

Turn in the road, colloquially known as a “3 point turn”, although more than 3 moves may be necessary.
Reverse around a corner
Reverse park into a parking space either parallel to the kerb (on road), or oblique or right-angle (in a marked bay in an off-road car park)
This change from two manoeuvres to one was introduced to allow time for the independent driving section of the test that was introduced on 4 October 2010.

Manoeuvres are selected at random by the examiner depending on the route chosen and conditions on the route.

General driving[edit]
Generally, the candidate must demonstrate an ability to drive in various road and traffic conditions [20] and react appropriately in actual risk situations.[19] The conditions typically encountered on test include driving in urban areas as well as higher speed limit roads where possible; this includes dual carriageways but not motorways as motorways in Britain can only be used by full licence holders. The object of the test is to ensure that the candidate is well grounded in the basic principles of safe driving, and is sufficiently practised in them to be able to show, at the time of the test, that they are a competent and considerate driver and are not a source of danger to themselves or to other road users. The drive will include two or three normal stops at (and moving away from) the side of the road on level roads as well as on gradients, in addition to a demonstration of moving away from behind a stationary vehicle.[16] The regulations state that the on-road driving time must be no less than 30 minutes.[21] If at any point during the test, the examiner has to intervene with any controls, this will usually result in failure and could be marked on the test report as a dangerous fault.

Independent driving[edit]
The test includes a 10-minute section of independent driving. It is included in the following practical driving tests:

car
motorcycle module two
large goods vehicle (LGV)
passenger carrying vehicle (PCV) tests
approved driving instructor (ADI) driving ability (sometimes called ‘part two’)
taxi
During the independent driving section, candidates have to drive by:

following traffic signs to a destination, or
following a series of verbal instructions, or
following a combination of both.
To help candidates understand where they are to go, the examiner may show them a route diagram. It does not matter if candidates do not remember every direction, nor if they deviate from the intended route unless they commit a driving fault.

If there are poor or obscured traffic signs, the examiner will give the candidate directions until they can see the next traffic sign. Candidates will not need to have a detailed knowledge of the area, but will not be allowed to use Automotive navigation system for this part of the test.

If the candidate has special needs, the examiner will be able to make reasonable adjustments. For the independent driving section, this could be asking the candidate which method they prefer – following signs, or a series of directions (a maximum of three) [22]

As of 4th December 2017

The U.K driving test will change, all the relevant changes can be found here driving test or read this article [23]on the new changes being made.

DVSA, Workington,Workington Driving Test Centre,Moss Bay House 40 Peart Road,Derwent Howe Industrial Estate,Workington,,CA14 3YT

📞 We can forward your call to DVSA Now

Calls to 084 numbers cost 7ppm plus network charges. We are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned on this page. Looking for your local DVSA Driving Test Centre? Here’s everything you need to know:

Address:
DVSA Driving Test Centre, Workington,Workington Driving Test Centre,Moss Bay House 40 Peart Road,Derwent Howe Industrial Estate,Workington,,CA14 3YT


Opening hours:
Most Driving test Centres are open from 8am to 7pm on weekdays, 8am – 2pm on Saturdays and are closed on Sundays. We have been unable to determine whether this is the case for this centre.

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
DVSA Driving Test Centre, Workington,Workington Driving Test Centre,Moss Bay House 40 Peart Road,Derwent Howe Industrial Estate,Workington,,CA14 3YT (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8937
Driving Test Booking (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8930
VOSA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7344
Car Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 2173
Driving Licence (general) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8928
DVLA (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 507 7920
Road Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2576
Personalised Registration Plates (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8922
Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0226
Provisional Licence (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8927
Theory Test (bookings) (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 8924
Medical Issues (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7271
V5C and Log Books (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075
Driver Check Service (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 902 7075

About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About DVSA
from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

from Wikipedia

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) is an executive agency of the UK Department for Transport (DfT).

It carries out driving tests, approves people to be driving instructors and MOT testers, carries out tests to make sure lorries and buses are safe to drive, carries out roadside checks on drivers and vehicles, and monitors vehicle recalls.

The responsibilities of DVSA only cover Great Britain. In Northern Ireland the same role is carried out by the Driver and Vehicle Agency (DVA).

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Purpose and aims
3 Responsibilities
4 See also
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
It was announced on 20 June 2013 that the Driving Standards Agency (DSA) and Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (VOSA) would merge into a single agency in 2014[2]. The name of the new agency was confirmed as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) on 28 November 2013.[3]

DSA and VOSA were abolished on 31 March 2014, and DVSA took over their responsibilities on 1 April 2014.

Purpose and aims[edit]
DVSA’s stated purpose is ‘helping you stay safe on Britain’s roads. It does this by:

helping people through a lifetime of safe driving
helping people keep their vehicles safe to drive
protecting people from unsafe drivers and vehicles
On 30 March 2017, DVSA published a strategy for 2017 to 2022[4] setting out how it would do this.

Responsibilities[edit]
DVSA is responsible for:

setting the standard for safe and responsible driving and riding
carrying out theory and practical driving tests for all types of motor vehicles
maintaining the register of approved driving instructors
approving training bodies and instructors to provide compulsory basic training and direct access scheme courses for motorcyclists
running the tests that allow people to join and stay on the voluntary register of driver trainers who train drivers of car and van fleets
setting the standards for the drink-drive rehabilitation scheme, running the scheme and approving the courses that offenders can take
conducting annual testing of lorries, buses and trailers through authorised testing facilities (ATFs) and goods vehicle testing stations (GVTS)
conducting routine and targeted checks on vehicles, drivers and operators ensuring compliance with road safety legislation and environmental standards
supervising the MOT scheme so that over 20,000 authorised garages carry out MOT tests to the correct standards
providing administrative support to the Traffic Commissioners in considering and processing applications for licenses to operate lorries, buses, coaches and registered bus services
conducting post-collision investigations
monitoring products for manufacturing or design defects, highlighting safety concerns and monitoring safety recalls
providing a range of educational and advisory activities to promote road safety

About UK Driving Tests
from Wikipedia

The United Kingdom driving test is a test of competence that UK residents take in order to obtain a full Great Britain or Northern Ireland (car) driving licence or to add additional full entitlements to an existing one.[1] Tests vary depending on the class of vehicle to be driven. In Great Britain it is administered by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA)[2] and in Northern Ireland by the Driver & Vehicle Agency (DVA).[3]

The minimum age at which one can take a UK driving test is currently 16 for mopeds and 17 for cars (16 for those on the higher/enhanced rate of the mobility component of DLA or PIP[4]). There is no upper age limit. In addition to a driving licence, a CBT certificate may be required before a moped or motorcycle is ridden.[5]

In GB around 1.6 million people sit the practical car test per year, with a pass rate of around 43%.[6] The theory test has a pass rate of around 51.6%.[7]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 The current test
2.1 Theory test
2.1.1 Multiple-choice test
2.1.2 Hazard perception
2.2 Practical test
2.2.1 Format
2.2.2 Eyesight test
2.2.3 Vehicle safety questions
2.2.4 Controlled stop
2.2.5 Manoeuvres
2.2.6 General driving
2.2.7 Independent driving
3 See also
4 References
5 External links
History[edit]
UK driving licences were introduced by the Motor Car Act 1903 but no test was required.[8]

A test for disabled drivers was introduced by the Road Traffic Act 1930.[9]

Legislation for compulsory testing was introduced for all new drivers with the Road Traffic Act 1934. The test was initially voluntary to avoid a rush of candidates until 1 June 1935 when all people who had started to drive on or after 1 April 1934 needed to have passed the test.[9]

Testing was suspended during World War II,[9] and was suspended again during the Suez Crisis in 1956 to allow examiners help to administer petrol rations.[9]

The driving theory test was introduced in July 1996 as a written examination, which was updated to computerised format in 2000.[9]

The hazard perception segment of the theory test, was introduced in November 2002.

In January 2015, new CGI clips replaced the real-life video clips in the Hazard Perception Test.[10]

The current test[edit]
Currently, there are two tests (for a car licence) that need to be passed in order to obtain a full driving licence. First the theory test and then, within two years of passing this, the practical test.

Theory test[edit]
The theory test is made up of two parts, both of which differ according to the type of vehicle licence the candidate is pursuing:

Multiple-choice test
Hazard perception test
Both parts must be passed in order to obtain a theory test pass certificate. This enables the candidate to book a practical driving test.[6] Candidates have two years from the date that they passed the first part of their theory test to take their practical test, or they will have to pass both parts of the theory test once again before they can book a practical test.

Multiple-choice test[edit]
This part of the theory test is performed on a computer system. The test has 50 multiple choice questions and the candidate must answer at least 43 of them correctly to pass.[11] All questions are randomly selected from a bank of just under one thousand on a selection of topics.

The test lasts for 57 minutes although candidates with certain special needs can apply for more time.[12] All 50 questions must be answered. The test allows 15 minutes practice time at the start of the exam to get used to answering the questions and how to use the system. To answer a question the candidate simply touches their choice of answer from the listed answers on the computer screen. If a mistake is made the candidate can deselect a choice and reselect a different option. The candidate is allowed to go back to a question at any time and can also flag questions they are unsure of in order to find and return to it quickly and easily later.[11] To pass the test, 43 of the 50 questions (86%) must be answered correctly.[6]

For lorry and bus drivers, 100 questions are asked over a 115-minute period, and 85 out of 100 must be answered correctly to pass.

Prior to 3 September 2007, the car and motorcycle multiple-choice tests comprised 35 questions, with a pass mark of 30 within a 40-minute time limit.

Hazard perception[edit]
Main article: Hazard Perception Test
Candidates watch fourteen one-minute clips (nineteen clips for lorry and bus candidates) filmed from the perspective of a car driver or motorcyclist and have to indicate, usually by clicking a mouse button or touching the screen, when they observe a developing hazard.[13]

Practical test[edit]
Unless one is converting a foreign licence, it is necessary to have passed both components of the theory test before sitting this exam.[14] Passing the practical test then entitles one to hold a full UK driving licence.[1]

The test candidate must produce their provisional licence for the examiner before the test starts.

The practical car test can be taken in either a manual or an automatic car; if the test is passed in an automatic car, then the full licence granted will be restricted to automatic cars only.

The practical motorcycle test is split into two separate modules – the off-road module and the on-road module. To get a full motorcycle licence, the candidate needs to pass both modules. The target waiting time for a practical driving test is six weeks. However, in practice the waiting time can be considerably longer.[15]

DSA Form DL25C: Driving Test Report issued NG5 to candidates by examiners
Format[edit]
The practical car test is taken on the road, with a professionally trained DVSA examiner directing the candidate around a pre-determined route. The examiner marks the candidate for driving faults, serious faults, and dangerous faults. A candidate will fail the test if he or she accumulates any serious or dangerous faults, or more than fifteen driving faults. If a candidate accumulates several driving faults in the same category, the examiner may consider the fault habitual and mark a serious fault in that category. The test usually lasts 38 to 40 minutes in a standard test, or approximately 70 minutes when the candidate is taking an extended test after having had their licence revoked.[16]

Eyesight test[edit]
Before getting to the car, the examiner will ask the candidate to read a car’s number plate at a distance. The distance required is 20.5 metres for an old-style plate (A123 ABC) and 20 metres for a new style plate (AB51 ABC).[17] If the candidate needs glasses to do this, then they must be worn during the test. If the candidate fails to read the first number plate correctly, then the examiner asks the candidate to read a second number plate. If the candidate cannot correctly read the second number plate, then the examiner must use a tape measure to measure the correct distance between the candidate and a third number plate. If the candidate cannot read the third number plate, then the candidate is deemed to have failed and the test will not continue.

Vehicle safety questions[edit]
Before the candidate is taken out onto the road, the examiner asks two questions about car maintenance and safety. These are phrased in the form “Show me…” and “Tell me…”; as such, this component of the test is often known as “Show me, tell me”. For example:

Show me how you would check that the power assisted steering is working before starting a journey.
Open the bonnet, identify where you would check the engine oil level and tell me how you would check that the engine has sufficient oil.
A failure to answer one or both of these questions correctly would result in a driving fault being marked against the candidate. The questions that may be asked are changed from time to time. From July 2008, there are 19 different questions which can be asked in 13 different combinations.[18]

Controlled stop[edit]
The controlled stop, more commonly referred to as the “emergency stop”, is an exercise which determines the ability of the candidate to stop the vehicle promptly yet under control during a simulated emergency. The simulation is performed by the examiner raising his or her hand and saying, “STOP!”. A controlled stop exercise will be carried out on every extended test and one third of normal tests. This might be an emergency stop, or the candidate might be asked to make a controlled stop in a specific location.[16] During dangerous weather conditions, such as rain and snow, this test can be left out for safety reasons.

Manoeuvres[edit]
During the test, the examiner will ask the candidate to carry out one manoeuvre from the following list:[19]

Turn in the road, colloquially known as a “3 point turn”, although more than 3 moves may be necessary.
Reverse around a corner
Reverse park into a parking space either parallel to the kerb (on road), or oblique or right-angle (in a marked bay in an off-road car park)
This change from two manoeuvres to one was introduced to allow time for the independent driving section of the test that was introduced on 4 October 2010.

Manoeuvres are selected at random by the examiner depending on the route chosen and conditions on the route.

General driving[edit]
Generally, the candidate must demonstrate an ability to drive in various road and traffic conditions [20] and react appropriately in actual risk situations.[19] The conditions typically encountered on test include driving in urban areas as well as higher speed limit roads where possible; this includes dual carriageways but not motorways as motorways in Britain can only be used by full licence holders. The object of the test is to ensure that the candidate is well grounded in the basic principles of safe driving, and is sufficiently practised in them to be able to show, at the time of the test, that they are a competent and considerate driver and are not a source of danger to themselves or to other road users. The drive will include two or three normal stops at (and moving away from) the side of the road on level roads as well as on gradients, in addition to a demonstration of moving away from behind a stationary vehicle.[16] The regulations state that the on-road driving time must be no less than 30 minutes.[21] If at any point during the test, the examiner has to intervene with any controls, this will usually result in failure and could be marked on the test report as a dangerous fault.

Independent driving[edit]
The test includes a 10-minute section of independent driving. It is included in the following practical driving tests:

car
motorcycle module two
large goods vehicle (LGV)
passenger carrying vehicle (PCV) tests
approved driving instructor (ADI) driving ability (sometimes called ‘part two’)
taxi
During the independent driving section, candidates have to drive by:

following traffic signs to a destination, or
following a series of verbal instructions, or
following a combination of both.
To help candidates understand where they are to go, the examiner may show them a route diagram. It does not matter if candidates do not remember every direction, nor if they deviate from the intended route unless they commit a driving fault.

If there are poor or obscured traffic signs, the examiner will give the candidate directions until they can see the next traffic sign. Candidates will not need to have a detailed knowledge of the area, but will not be allowed to use Automotive navigation system for this part of the test.

If the candidate has special needs, the examiner will be able to make reasonable adjustments. For the independent driving section, this could be asking the candidate which method they prefer – following signs, or a series of directions (a maximum of three) [22]

As of 4th December 2017

The U.K driving test will change, all the relevant changes can be found here driving test or read this article [23]on the new changes being made.