National Probation Service, Courthouse/Bunkers Hill, Skipton BD23 1HU, UK

According to Google Maps, this is an National Probation Service location.

Address:
National Probation Service, Courthouse/Bunkers Hill, Skipton BD23 1HU, UK

Opening hours:
We are unable to advise on the opening times for this location.

See the National Probation Service’s directory of community rehabilitation companies on the Gov.UK website here.

Useful Government telephone numbers:

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
Child Support Agency (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7325
Child Support Agency enquiries (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 538 5227
Child Maintenance Service enuiries (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 8306
CSA Applications (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0002
Child Maintenance Options (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 515 9404
Official Employment Tribunal listings site Click Here
Tax Code (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0106
Corporation Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0052
Tax Credits (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2578
Inheritance Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 506 0299
Tax Rebate (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2577
Child Tax Credit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2445
Working Tax Credit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2443
Tax Office (HMRC) (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0147
Income Support (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0249
Incapacity Benefit (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2466
Universal Credit (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2346
Universal Credit (New Claims & Appointments) (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0140
Social Fund (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2467
Maternity Allowance (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0145
Personal Independence Payment (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2350

Directions:
Click here for directions to National Probation Service, Courthouse/Bunkers Hill, Skipton BD23 1HU, UK on Google Maps

About National probation Service
from Wikipedia

The National Probation Service for England and Wales is a statutory criminal justice service, mainly responsible for the supervision of offenders in the community and the provision of reports to the criminal courts to assist them in their sentencing duties. It was established in its current form by the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act in April 2001, but has existed since 1907 as a set of area based services interacting at arms-length with central government.

Northern Ireland has its own probation service, whilst in Scotland criminal justice social work services are managed within the social work departments of local authorities.

The service is part of the Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS), which transferred to the Ministry of Justice from the Home Office on 9 May 2007. It comprises 42 probation areas which are coterminous with police force area boundaries, served by 35 probation trusts. Trusts are funded by NOMS and employ all staff except the chief officer; they are accountable to their boards (comprising up to fifteen members appointed by the Secretary of State) for day-to-day operations and financial management, and to NOMS via a Regional Offender Manager, with whom they have service level agreements, for performance against the targets for the offender management and interventions services for which they have been funded.

The work of probation trusts is scrutinised by NOMS, which reports independently to UK government ministers; and by HM Inspectorate of Probation. There are concerns that staff shortages, failure in communication and privatisation may be weakening the probation service and putting the public at risk.[1]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Criticism
3 See also
4 Notes
5 External links
History[edit]
The Church of England Temperance Society and other voluntary societies appointed missionaries to the London police courts during the late nineteenth century. From this developed the system of releasing offenders on the condition that they kept in touch with the missionary and accepted guidance. In 1907 this supervision was given a statutory basis which allowed courts to appoint and employ probation officers.[2]

The service, at the start of 2004, had some 18,000 staff. Statistics for the year 2002 state that it supervised just less than 193,000 offenders and provided 253,000 pre-sentence reports to courts in England and Wales, advising them on the background of and proposing appropriate sentences for convicted offenders. In addition, it has responsibility for ensuring that victims of violent and sexual crime resulting in prison sentences of over 12 months are consulted before offenders are released from custody.

The advent of NOMS in 2004 changed the pattern of correctional services delivery in England and Wales. The Offender Management Bill, introduced in Parliament late in 2006, was intended to enable probation areas to become trusts as part of wider government policy to open up the provision of correctional services to greater competition from the voluntary, community, and private sectors. This was one of the recommendations of the Carter Report (2003): others were to introduce a system of end-to-end offender management, with one named offender manager having responsibility for an offender throughout his or her sentence (be it in custody, the community, or both), and to rebalance sentencing in order to redress the drift towards less and less serious offences resulting in imprisonment or community sentences. Carter saw the need to improve public and sentencer confidence not only in community sentences but also in the fine as credible sanctions for appropriate offenders and offences.

The Bill completed its passage through Parliament in July 2007, and the first six probation trusts came into being on 1 April 2008 (Merseyside, South Wales, Humberside, Dyfed/Powys, West Mercia and Leicestershire & Rutland). Lancashire Probation Trust achieved Trust status on 1 April 2009.

Criticism[edit]
An article in The Guardian suggests privatisation of the probation service was done in haste, underfunded and is failing.[3]

The probation service in London is understaffed and many probation officers are inexperienced. Probationers are seen too infrequently and some are overlooked. A proper risk assessment is not done in the majority of cases.[4] Pivatisation of probation service continues to produce “troubling” results. The Chief Inspector of Pobation disclosed that probation supervision for one in four low-risk offenders in Gwent is no more than a phone call every six weeks.[5] HM Inspectorate of Probation maintains half of cases have no proper assessment of risk of harm. Junior officers working for Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) sometimes manage over 200 cases each though at most 60 can be managed safely.[6]

Not enough is done to supervise former prisoners after release from jail and disccourage reoffending. Glenys Stacey, Chief Inspector of Probation said, “Although there are exceptions, the community rehabilitation companies… are not generally producing good quality work, not at all.”[7]

Probation Service, First Floor/Empire House/Newbottle St, Houghton le Spring DH4 4AF, UK

According to Google Maps, this is an National Probation Service location.

Address:
Probation Service, First Floor/Empire House/Newbottle St, Houghton le Spring DH4 4AF, UK

Opening hours:
We are unable to advise on the opening times for this location.

See the National Probation Service’s directory of community rehabilitation companies on the Gov.UK website here.

Useful Government telephone numbers:

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
Child Support Agency (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7325
Child Support Agency enquiries (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 538 5227
Child Maintenance Service enuiries (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 8306
CSA Applications (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0002
Child Maintenance Options (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 515 9404
Official Employment Tribunal listings site Click Here
Tax Code (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0106
Corporation Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0052
Tax Credits (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2578
Inheritance Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 506 0299
Tax Rebate (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2577
Child Tax Credit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2445
Working Tax Credit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2443
Tax Office (HMRC) (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0147
Income Support (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0249
Incapacity Benefit (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2466
Universal Credit (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2346
Universal Credit (New Claims & Appointments) (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0140
Social Fund (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2467
Maternity Allowance (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0145
Personal Independence Payment (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2350

Directions:
Click here for directions to Probation Service, First Floor/Empire House/Newbottle St, Houghton le Spring DH4 4AF, UK on Google Maps

About National probation Service
from Wikipedia

The National Probation Service for England and Wales is a statutory criminal justice service, mainly responsible for the supervision of offenders in the community and the provision of reports to the criminal courts to assist them in their sentencing duties. It was established in its current form by the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act in April 2001, but has existed since 1907 as a set of area based services interacting at arms-length with central government.

Northern Ireland has its own probation service, whilst in Scotland criminal justice social work services are managed within the social work departments of local authorities.

The service is part of the Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS), which transferred to the Ministry of Justice from the Home Office on 9 May 2007. It comprises 42 probation areas which are coterminous with police force area boundaries, served by 35 probation trusts. Trusts are funded by NOMS and employ all staff except the chief officer; they are accountable to their boards (comprising up to fifteen members appointed by the Secretary of State) for day-to-day operations and financial management, and to NOMS via a Regional Offender Manager, with whom they have service level agreements, for performance against the targets for the offender management and interventions services for which they have been funded.

The work of probation trusts is scrutinised by NOMS, which reports independently to UK government ministers; and by HM Inspectorate of Probation. There are concerns that staff shortages, failure in communication and privatisation may be weakening the probation service and putting the public at risk.[1]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Criticism
3 See also
4 Notes
5 External links
History[edit]
The Church of England Temperance Society and other voluntary societies appointed missionaries to the London police courts during the late nineteenth century. From this developed the system of releasing offenders on the condition that they kept in touch with the missionary and accepted guidance. In 1907 this supervision was given a statutory basis which allowed courts to appoint and employ probation officers.[2]

The service, at the start of 2004, had some 18,000 staff. Statistics for the year 2002 state that it supervised just less than 193,000 offenders and provided 253,000 pre-sentence reports to courts in England and Wales, advising them on the background of and proposing appropriate sentences for convicted offenders. In addition, it has responsibility for ensuring that victims of violent and sexual crime resulting in prison sentences of over 12 months are consulted before offenders are released from custody.

The advent of NOMS in 2004 changed the pattern of correctional services delivery in England and Wales. The Offender Management Bill, introduced in Parliament late in 2006, was intended to enable probation areas to become trusts as part of wider government policy to open up the provision of correctional services to greater competition from the voluntary, community, and private sectors. This was one of the recommendations of the Carter Report (2003): others were to introduce a system of end-to-end offender management, with one named offender manager having responsibility for an offender throughout his or her sentence (be it in custody, the community, or both), and to rebalance sentencing in order to redress the drift towards less and less serious offences resulting in imprisonment or community sentences. Carter saw the need to improve public and sentencer confidence not only in community sentences but also in the fine as credible sanctions for appropriate offenders and offences.

The Bill completed its passage through Parliament in July 2007, and the first six probation trusts came into being on 1 April 2008 (Merseyside, South Wales, Humberside, Dyfed/Powys, West Mercia and Leicestershire & Rutland). Lancashire Probation Trust achieved Trust status on 1 April 2009.

Criticism[edit]
An article in The Guardian suggests privatisation of the probation service was done in haste, underfunded and is failing.[3]

The probation service in London is understaffed and many probation officers are inexperienced. Probationers are seen too infrequently and some are overlooked. A proper risk assessment is not done in the majority of cases.[4] Pivatisation of probation service continues to produce “troubling” results. The Chief Inspector of Pobation disclosed that probation supervision for one in four low-risk offenders in Gwent is no more than a phone call every six weeks.[5] HM Inspectorate of Probation maintains half of cases have no proper assessment of risk of harm. Junior officers working for Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) sometimes manage over 200 cases each though at most 60 can be managed safely.[6]

Not enough is done to supervise former prisoners after release from jail and disccourage reoffending. Glenys Stacey, Chief Inspector of Probation said, “Although there are exceptions, the community rehabilitation companies… are not generally producing good quality work, not at all.”[7]

National Probation Service, Essex Lodge, 16 S Parade, Northallerton DL7 8SG, UK

According to Google Maps, this is an National Probation Service location.

Address:
National Probation Service, Essex Lodge, 16 S Parade, Northallerton DL7 8SG, UK

Opening hours:
We are unable to advise on the opening times for this location.

See the National Probation Service’s directory of community rehabilitation companies on the Gov.UK website here.

Useful Government telephone numbers:

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
Child Support Agency (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7325
Child Support Agency enquiries (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 538 5227
Child Maintenance Service enuiries (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 8306
CSA Applications (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0002
Child Maintenance Options (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 515 9404
Official Employment Tribunal listings site Click Here
Tax Code (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0106
Corporation Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0052
Tax Credits (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2578
Inheritance Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 506 0299
Tax Rebate (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2577
Child Tax Credit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2445
Working Tax Credit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2443
Tax Office (HMRC) (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0147
Income Support (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0249
Incapacity Benefit (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2466
Universal Credit (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2346
Universal Credit (New Claims & Appointments) (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0140
Social Fund (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2467
Maternity Allowance (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0145
Personal Independence Payment (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2350

Directions:
Click here for directions to National Probation Service, Essex Lodge, 16 S Parade, Northallerton DL7 8SG, UK on Google Maps

About National probation Service
from Wikipedia

The National Probation Service for England and Wales is a statutory criminal justice service, mainly responsible for the supervision of offenders in the community and the provision of reports to the criminal courts to assist them in their sentencing duties. It was established in its current form by the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act in April 2001, but has existed since 1907 as a set of area based services interacting at arms-length with central government.

Northern Ireland has its own probation service, whilst in Scotland criminal justice social work services are managed within the social work departments of local authorities.

The service is part of the Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS), which transferred to the Ministry of Justice from the Home Office on 9 May 2007. It comprises 42 probation areas which are coterminous with police force area boundaries, served by 35 probation trusts. Trusts are funded by NOMS and employ all staff except the chief officer; they are accountable to their boards (comprising up to fifteen members appointed by the Secretary of State) for day-to-day operations and financial management, and to NOMS via a Regional Offender Manager, with whom they have service level agreements, for performance against the targets for the offender management and interventions services for which they have been funded.

The work of probation trusts is scrutinised by NOMS, which reports independently to UK government ministers; and by HM Inspectorate of Probation. There are concerns that staff shortages, failure in communication and privatisation may be weakening the probation service and putting the public at risk.[1]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Criticism
3 See also
4 Notes
5 External links
History[edit]
The Church of England Temperance Society and other voluntary societies appointed missionaries to the London police courts during the late nineteenth century. From this developed the system of releasing offenders on the condition that they kept in touch with the missionary and accepted guidance. In 1907 this supervision was given a statutory basis which allowed courts to appoint and employ probation officers.[2]

The service, at the start of 2004, had some 18,000 staff. Statistics for the year 2002 state that it supervised just less than 193,000 offenders and provided 253,000 pre-sentence reports to courts in England and Wales, advising them on the background of and proposing appropriate sentences for convicted offenders. In addition, it has responsibility for ensuring that victims of violent and sexual crime resulting in prison sentences of over 12 months are consulted before offenders are released from custody.

The advent of NOMS in 2004 changed the pattern of correctional services delivery in England and Wales. The Offender Management Bill, introduced in Parliament late in 2006, was intended to enable probation areas to become trusts as part of wider government policy to open up the provision of correctional services to greater competition from the voluntary, community, and private sectors. This was one of the recommendations of the Carter Report (2003): others were to introduce a system of end-to-end offender management, with one named offender manager having responsibility for an offender throughout his or her sentence (be it in custody, the community, or both), and to rebalance sentencing in order to redress the drift towards less and less serious offences resulting in imprisonment or community sentences. Carter saw the need to improve public and sentencer confidence not only in community sentences but also in the fine as credible sanctions for appropriate offenders and offences.

The Bill completed its passage through Parliament in July 2007, and the first six probation trusts came into being on 1 April 2008 (Merseyside, South Wales, Humberside, Dyfed/Powys, West Mercia and Leicestershire & Rutland). Lancashire Probation Trust achieved Trust status on 1 April 2009.

Criticism[edit]
An article in The Guardian suggests privatisation of the probation service was done in haste, underfunded and is failing.[3]

The probation service in London is understaffed and many probation officers are inexperienced. Probationers are seen too infrequently and some are overlooked. A proper risk assessment is not done in the majority of cases.[4] Pivatisation of probation service continues to produce “troubling” results. The Chief Inspector of Pobation disclosed that probation supervision for one in four low-risk offenders in Gwent is no more than a phone call every six weeks.[5] HM Inspectorate of Probation maintains half of cases have no proper assessment of risk of harm. Junior officers working for Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) sometimes manage over 200 cases each though at most 60 can be managed safely.[6]

Not enough is done to supervise former prisoners after release from jail and disccourage reoffending. Glenys Stacey, Chief Inspector of Probation said, “Although there are exceptions, the community rehabilitation companies… are not generally producing good quality work, not at all.”[7]

Probation Service, 3-4 Shaw St, Worcester WR1 3QQ, UK

According to Google Maps, this is an National Probation Service location.

Address:
Probation Service, 3-4 Shaw St, Worcester WR1 3QQ, UK

Opening hours:
We are unable to advise on the opening times for this location.

See the National Probation Service’s directory of community rehabilitation companies on the Gov.UK website here.

Useful Government telephone numbers:

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
Child Support Agency (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7325
Child Support Agency enquiries (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 538 5227
Child Maintenance Service enuiries (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 8306
CSA Applications (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0002
Child Maintenance Options (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 515 9404
Official Employment Tribunal listings site Click Here
Tax Code (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0106
Corporation Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0052
Tax Credits (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2578
Inheritance Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 506 0299
Tax Rebate (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2577
Child Tax Credit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2445
Working Tax Credit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2443
Tax Office (HMRC) (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0147
Income Support (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0249
Incapacity Benefit (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2466
Universal Credit (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2346
Universal Credit (New Claims & Appointments) (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0140
Social Fund (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2467
Maternity Allowance (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0145
Personal Independence Payment (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2350

Directions:
Click here for directions to Probation Service, 3-4 Shaw St, Worcester WR1 3QQ, UK on Google Maps

About National probation Service
from Wikipedia

The National Probation Service for England and Wales is a statutory criminal justice service, mainly responsible for the supervision of offenders in the community and the provision of reports to the criminal courts to assist them in their sentencing duties. It was established in its current form by the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act in April 2001, but has existed since 1907 as a set of area based services interacting at arms-length with central government.

Northern Ireland has its own probation service, whilst in Scotland criminal justice social work services are managed within the social work departments of local authorities.

The service is part of the Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS), which transferred to the Ministry of Justice from the Home Office on 9 May 2007. It comprises 42 probation areas which are coterminous with police force area boundaries, served by 35 probation trusts. Trusts are funded by NOMS and employ all staff except the chief officer; they are accountable to their boards (comprising up to fifteen members appointed by the Secretary of State) for day-to-day operations and financial management, and to NOMS via a Regional Offender Manager, with whom they have service level agreements, for performance against the targets for the offender management and interventions services for which they have been funded.

The work of probation trusts is scrutinised by NOMS, which reports independently to UK government ministers; and by HM Inspectorate of Probation. There are concerns that staff shortages, failure in communication and privatisation may be weakening the probation service and putting the public at risk.[1]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Criticism
3 See also
4 Notes
5 External links
History[edit]
The Church of England Temperance Society and other voluntary societies appointed missionaries to the London police courts during the late nineteenth century. From this developed the system of releasing offenders on the condition that they kept in touch with the missionary and accepted guidance. In 1907 this supervision was given a statutory basis which allowed courts to appoint and employ probation officers.[2]

The service, at the start of 2004, had some 18,000 staff. Statistics for the year 2002 state that it supervised just less than 193,000 offenders and provided 253,000 pre-sentence reports to courts in England and Wales, advising them on the background of and proposing appropriate sentences for convicted offenders. In addition, it has responsibility for ensuring that victims of violent and sexual crime resulting in prison sentences of over 12 months are consulted before offenders are released from custody.

The advent of NOMS in 2004 changed the pattern of correctional services delivery in England and Wales. The Offender Management Bill, introduced in Parliament late in 2006, was intended to enable probation areas to become trusts as part of wider government policy to open up the provision of correctional services to greater competition from the voluntary, community, and private sectors. This was one of the recommendations of the Carter Report (2003): others were to introduce a system of end-to-end offender management, with one named offender manager having responsibility for an offender throughout his or her sentence (be it in custody, the community, or both), and to rebalance sentencing in order to redress the drift towards less and less serious offences resulting in imprisonment or community sentences. Carter saw the need to improve public and sentencer confidence not only in community sentences but also in the fine as credible sanctions for appropriate offenders and offences.

The Bill completed its passage through Parliament in July 2007, and the first six probation trusts came into being on 1 April 2008 (Merseyside, South Wales, Humberside, Dyfed/Powys, West Mercia and Leicestershire & Rutland). Lancashire Probation Trust achieved Trust status on 1 April 2009.

Criticism[edit]
An article in The Guardian suggests privatisation of the probation service was done in haste, underfunded and is failing.[3]

The probation service in London is understaffed and many probation officers are inexperienced. Probationers are seen too infrequently and some are overlooked. A proper risk assessment is not done in the majority of cases.[4] Pivatisation of probation service continues to produce “troubling” results. The Chief Inspector of Pobation disclosed that probation supervision for one in four low-risk offenders in Gwent is no more than a phone call every six weeks.[5] HM Inspectorate of Probation maintains half of cases have no proper assessment of risk of harm. Junior officers working for Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) sometimes manage over 200 cases each though at most 60 can be managed safely.[6]

Not enough is done to supervise former prisoners after release from jail and disccourage reoffending. Glenys Stacey, Chief Inspector of Probation said, “Although there are exceptions, the community rehabilitation companies… are not generally producing good quality work, not at all.”[7]

National Probation Service, 1 Park Sq, Laneham St, Scunthorpe DN15 6JH, UK

According to Google Maps, this is an National Probation Service location.

Address:
National Probation Service, 1 Park Sq, Laneham St, Scunthorpe DN15 6JH, UK

Opening hours:
We are unable to advise on the opening times for this location.

See the National Probation Service’s directory of community rehabilitation companies on the Gov.UK website here.

Useful Government telephone numbers:

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
Child Support Agency (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7325
Child Support Agency enquiries (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 538 5227
Child Maintenance Service enuiries (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 8306
CSA Applications (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0002
Child Maintenance Options (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 515 9404
Official Employment Tribunal listings site Click Here
Tax Code (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0106
Corporation Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0052
Tax Credits (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2578
Inheritance Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 506 0299
Tax Rebate (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2577
Child Tax Credit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2445
Working Tax Credit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2443
Tax Office (HMRC) (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0147
Income Support (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0249
Incapacity Benefit (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2466
Universal Credit (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2346
Universal Credit (New Claims & Appointments) (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0140
Social Fund (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2467
Maternity Allowance (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0145
Personal Independence Payment (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2350

Directions:
Click here for directions to National Probation Service, 1 Park Sq, Laneham St, Scunthorpe DN15 6JH, UK on Google Maps

About National probation Service
from Wikipedia

The National Probation Service for England and Wales is a statutory criminal justice service, mainly responsible for the supervision of offenders in the community and the provision of reports to the criminal courts to assist them in their sentencing duties. It was established in its current form by the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act in April 2001, but has existed since 1907 as a set of area based services interacting at arms-length with central government.

Northern Ireland has its own probation service, whilst in Scotland criminal justice social work services are managed within the social work departments of local authorities.

The service is part of the Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS), which transferred to the Ministry of Justice from the Home Office on 9 May 2007. It comprises 42 probation areas which are coterminous with police force area boundaries, served by 35 probation trusts. Trusts are funded by NOMS and employ all staff except the chief officer; they are accountable to their boards (comprising up to fifteen members appointed by the Secretary of State) for day-to-day operations and financial management, and to NOMS via a Regional Offender Manager, with whom they have service level agreements, for performance against the targets for the offender management and interventions services for which they have been funded.

The work of probation trusts is scrutinised by NOMS, which reports independently to UK government ministers; and by HM Inspectorate of Probation. There are concerns that staff shortages, failure in communication and privatisation may be weakening the probation service and putting the public at risk.[1]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Criticism
3 See also
4 Notes
5 External links
History[edit]
The Church of England Temperance Society and other voluntary societies appointed missionaries to the London police courts during the late nineteenth century. From this developed the system of releasing offenders on the condition that they kept in touch with the missionary and accepted guidance. In 1907 this supervision was given a statutory basis which allowed courts to appoint and employ probation officers.[2]

The service, at the start of 2004, had some 18,000 staff. Statistics for the year 2002 state that it supervised just less than 193,000 offenders and provided 253,000 pre-sentence reports to courts in England and Wales, advising them on the background of and proposing appropriate sentences for convicted offenders. In addition, it has responsibility for ensuring that victims of violent and sexual crime resulting in prison sentences of over 12 months are consulted before offenders are released from custody.

The advent of NOMS in 2004 changed the pattern of correctional services delivery in England and Wales. The Offender Management Bill, introduced in Parliament late in 2006, was intended to enable probation areas to become trusts as part of wider government policy to open up the provision of correctional services to greater competition from the voluntary, community, and private sectors. This was one of the recommendations of the Carter Report (2003): others were to introduce a system of end-to-end offender management, with one named offender manager having responsibility for an offender throughout his or her sentence (be it in custody, the community, or both), and to rebalance sentencing in order to redress the drift towards less and less serious offences resulting in imprisonment or community sentences. Carter saw the need to improve public and sentencer confidence not only in community sentences but also in the fine as credible sanctions for appropriate offenders and offences.

The Bill completed its passage through Parliament in July 2007, and the first six probation trusts came into being on 1 April 2008 (Merseyside, South Wales, Humberside, Dyfed/Powys, West Mercia and Leicestershire & Rutland). Lancashire Probation Trust achieved Trust status on 1 April 2009.

Criticism[edit]
An article in The Guardian suggests privatisation of the probation service was done in haste, underfunded and is failing.[3]

The probation service in London is understaffed and many probation officers are inexperienced. Probationers are seen too infrequently and some are overlooked. A proper risk assessment is not done in the majority of cases.[4] Pivatisation of probation service continues to produce “troubling” results. The Chief Inspector of Pobation disclosed that probation supervision for one in four low-risk offenders in Gwent is no more than a phone call every six weeks.[5] HM Inspectorate of Probation maintains half of cases have no proper assessment of risk of harm. Junior officers working for Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) sometimes manage over 200 cases each though at most 60 can be managed safely.[6]

Not enough is done to supervise former prisoners after release from jail and disccourage reoffending. Glenys Stacey, Chief Inspector of Probation said, “Although there are exceptions, the community rehabilitation companies… are not generally producing good quality work, not at all.”[7]

Probation Service, Gaol St, Hereford HR1 2HU, UK

According to Google Maps, this is an National Probation Service location.

Address:
Probation Service, Gaol St, Hereford HR1 2HU, UK

Opening hours:
We are unable to advise on the opening times for this location.

See the National Probation Service’s directory of community rehabilitation companies on the Gov.UK website here.

Useful Government telephone numbers:

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
Child Support Agency (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7325
Child Support Agency enquiries (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 538 5227
Child Maintenance Service enuiries (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 8306
CSA Applications (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0002
Child Maintenance Options (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 515 9404
Official Employment Tribunal listings site Click Here
Tax Code (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0106
Corporation Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0052
Tax Credits (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2578
Inheritance Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 506 0299
Tax Rebate (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2577
Child Tax Credit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2445
Working Tax Credit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2443
Tax Office (HMRC) (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0147
Income Support (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0249
Incapacity Benefit (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2466
Universal Credit (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2346
Universal Credit (New Claims & Appointments) (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0140
Social Fund (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2467
Maternity Allowance (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0145
Personal Independence Payment (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2350

Directions:
Click here for directions to Probation Service, Gaol St, Hereford HR1 2HU, UK on Google Maps

About National probation Service
from Wikipedia

The National Probation Service for England and Wales is a statutory criminal justice service, mainly responsible for the supervision of offenders in the community and the provision of reports to the criminal courts to assist them in their sentencing duties. It was established in its current form by the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act in April 2001, but has existed since 1907 as a set of area based services interacting at arms-length with central government.

Northern Ireland has its own probation service, whilst in Scotland criminal justice social work services are managed within the social work departments of local authorities.

The service is part of the Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS), which transferred to the Ministry of Justice from the Home Office on 9 May 2007. It comprises 42 probation areas which are coterminous with police force area boundaries, served by 35 probation trusts. Trusts are funded by NOMS and employ all staff except the chief officer; they are accountable to their boards (comprising up to fifteen members appointed by the Secretary of State) for day-to-day operations and financial management, and to NOMS via a Regional Offender Manager, with whom they have service level agreements, for performance against the targets for the offender management and interventions services for which they have been funded.

The work of probation trusts is scrutinised by NOMS, which reports independently to UK government ministers; and by HM Inspectorate of Probation. There are concerns that staff shortages, failure in communication and privatisation may be weakening the probation service and putting the public at risk.[1]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Criticism
3 See also
4 Notes
5 External links
History[edit]
The Church of England Temperance Society and other voluntary societies appointed missionaries to the London police courts during the late nineteenth century. From this developed the system of releasing offenders on the condition that they kept in touch with the missionary and accepted guidance. In 1907 this supervision was given a statutory basis which allowed courts to appoint and employ probation officers.[2]

The service, at the start of 2004, had some 18,000 staff. Statistics for the year 2002 state that it supervised just less than 193,000 offenders and provided 253,000 pre-sentence reports to courts in England and Wales, advising them on the background of and proposing appropriate sentences for convicted offenders. In addition, it has responsibility for ensuring that victims of violent and sexual crime resulting in prison sentences of over 12 months are consulted before offenders are released from custody.

The advent of NOMS in 2004 changed the pattern of correctional services delivery in England and Wales. The Offender Management Bill, introduced in Parliament late in 2006, was intended to enable probation areas to become trusts as part of wider government policy to open up the provision of correctional services to greater competition from the voluntary, community, and private sectors. This was one of the recommendations of the Carter Report (2003): others were to introduce a system of end-to-end offender management, with one named offender manager having responsibility for an offender throughout his or her sentence (be it in custody, the community, or both), and to rebalance sentencing in order to redress the drift towards less and less serious offences resulting in imprisonment or community sentences. Carter saw the need to improve public and sentencer confidence not only in community sentences but also in the fine as credible sanctions for appropriate offenders and offences.

The Bill completed its passage through Parliament in July 2007, and the first six probation trusts came into being on 1 April 2008 (Merseyside, South Wales, Humberside, Dyfed/Powys, West Mercia and Leicestershire & Rutland). Lancashire Probation Trust achieved Trust status on 1 April 2009.

Criticism[edit]
An article in The Guardian suggests privatisation of the probation service was done in haste, underfunded and is failing.[3]

The probation service in London is understaffed and many probation officers are inexperienced. Probationers are seen too infrequently and some are overlooked. A proper risk assessment is not done in the majority of cases.[4] Pivatisation of probation service continues to produce “troubling” results. The Chief Inspector of Pobation disclosed that probation supervision for one in four low-risk offenders in Gwent is no more than a phone call every six weeks.[5] HM Inspectorate of Probation maintains half of cases have no proper assessment of risk of harm. Junior officers working for Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) sometimes manage over 200 cases each though at most 60 can be managed safely.[6]

Not enough is done to supervise former prisoners after release from jail and disccourage reoffending. Glenys Stacey, Chief Inspector of Probation said, “Although there are exceptions, the community rehabilitation companies… are not generally producing good quality work, not at all.”[7]

National Probation Service, Westwey House, Westwey Rd, Weymouth DT4 8TG, UK

According to Google Maps, this is an National Probation Service location.

Address:
National Probation Service, Westwey House, Westwey Rd, Weymouth DT4 8TG, UK

Opening hours:
We are unable to advise on the opening times for this location.

See the National Probation Service’s directory of community rehabilitation companies on the Gov.UK website here.

Useful Government telephone numbers:

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
Child Support Agency (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7325
Child Support Agency enquiries (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 538 5227
Child Maintenance Service enuiries (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 8306
CSA Applications (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0002
Child Maintenance Options (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 515 9404
Official Employment Tribunal listings site Click Here
Tax Code (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0106
Corporation Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0052
Tax Credits (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2578
Inheritance Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 506 0299
Tax Rebate (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2577
Child Tax Credit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2445
Working Tax Credit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2443
Tax Office (HMRC) (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0147
Income Support (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0249
Incapacity Benefit (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2466
Universal Credit (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2346
Universal Credit (New Claims & Appointments) (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0140
Social Fund (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2467
Maternity Allowance (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0145
Personal Independence Payment (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2350

Directions:
Click here for directions to National Probation Service, Westwey House, Westwey Rd, Weymouth DT4 8TG, UK on Google Maps

About National probation Service
from Wikipedia

The National Probation Service for England and Wales is a statutory criminal justice service, mainly responsible for the supervision of offenders in the community and the provision of reports to the criminal courts to assist them in their sentencing duties. It was established in its current form by the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act in April 2001, but has existed since 1907 as a set of area based services interacting at arms-length with central government.

Northern Ireland has its own probation service, whilst in Scotland criminal justice social work services are managed within the social work departments of local authorities.

The service is part of the Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS), which transferred to the Ministry of Justice from the Home Office on 9 May 2007. It comprises 42 probation areas which are coterminous with police force area boundaries, served by 35 probation trusts. Trusts are funded by NOMS and employ all staff except the chief officer; they are accountable to their boards (comprising up to fifteen members appointed by the Secretary of State) for day-to-day operations and financial management, and to NOMS via a Regional Offender Manager, with whom they have service level agreements, for performance against the targets for the offender management and interventions services for which they have been funded.

The work of probation trusts is scrutinised by NOMS, which reports independently to UK government ministers; and by HM Inspectorate of Probation. There are concerns that staff shortages, failure in communication and privatisation may be weakening the probation service and putting the public at risk.[1]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Criticism
3 See also
4 Notes
5 External links
History[edit]
The Church of England Temperance Society and other voluntary societies appointed missionaries to the London police courts during the late nineteenth century. From this developed the system of releasing offenders on the condition that they kept in touch with the missionary and accepted guidance. In 1907 this supervision was given a statutory basis which allowed courts to appoint and employ probation officers.[2]

The service, at the start of 2004, had some 18,000 staff. Statistics for the year 2002 state that it supervised just less than 193,000 offenders and provided 253,000 pre-sentence reports to courts in England and Wales, advising them on the background of and proposing appropriate sentences for convicted offenders. In addition, it has responsibility for ensuring that victims of violent and sexual crime resulting in prison sentences of over 12 months are consulted before offenders are released from custody.

The advent of NOMS in 2004 changed the pattern of correctional services delivery in England and Wales. The Offender Management Bill, introduced in Parliament late in 2006, was intended to enable probation areas to become trusts as part of wider government policy to open up the provision of correctional services to greater competition from the voluntary, community, and private sectors. This was one of the recommendations of the Carter Report (2003): others were to introduce a system of end-to-end offender management, with one named offender manager having responsibility for an offender throughout his or her sentence (be it in custody, the community, or both), and to rebalance sentencing in order to redress the drift towards less and less serious offences resulting in imprisonment or community sentences. Carter saw the need to improve public and sentencer confidence not only in community sentences but also in the fine as credible sanctions for appropriate offenders and offences.

The Bill completed its passage through Parliament in July 2007, and the first six probation trusts came into being on 1 April 2008 (Merseyside, South Wales, Humberside, Dyfed/Powys, West Mercia and Leicestershire & Rutland). Lancashire Probation Trust achieved Trust status on 1 April 2009.

Criticism[edit]
An article in The Guardian suggests privatisation of the probation service was done in haste, underfunded and is failing.[3]

The probation service in London is understaffed and many probation officers are inexperienced. Probationers are seen too infrequently and some are overlooked. A proper risk assessment is not done in the majority of cases.[4] Pivatisation of probation service continues to produce “troubling” results. The Chief Inspector of Pobation disclosed that probation supervision for one in four low-risk offenders in Gwent is no more than a phone call every six weeks.[5] HM Inspectorate of Probation maintains half of cases have no proper assessment of risk of harm. Junior officers working for Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) sometimes manage over 200 cases each though at most 60 can be managed safely.[6]

Not enough is done to supervise former prisoners after release from jail and disccourage reoffending. Glenys Stacey, Chief Inspector of Probation said, “Although there are exceptions, the community rehabilitation companies… are not generally producing good quality work, not at all.”[7]

Probation Service, 77-79 Duke St, Barrow-in-Furness LA14 1RW, UK

According to Google Maps, this is an National Probation Service location.

Address:
Probation Service, 77-79 Duke St, Barrow-in-Furness LA14 1RW, UK

Opening hours:
We are unable to advise on the opening times for this location.

See the National Probation Service’s directory of community rehabilitation companies on the Gov.UK website here.

Useful Government telephone numbers:

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
Child Support Agency (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7325
Child Support Agency enquiries (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 538 5227
Child Maintenance Service enuiries (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 8306
CSA Applications (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0002
Child Maintenance Options (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 515 9404
Official Employment Tribunal listings site Click Here
Tax Code (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0106
Corporation Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0052
Tax Credits (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2578
Inheritance Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 506 0299
Tax Rebate (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2577
Child Tax Credit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2445
Working Tax Credit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2443
Tax Office (HMRC) (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0147
Income Support (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0249
Incapacity Benefit (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2466
Universal Credit (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2346
Universal Credit (New Claims & Appointments) (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0140
Social Fund (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2467
Maternity Allowance (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0145
Personal Independence Payment (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2350

Directions:
Click here for directions to Probation Service, 77-79 Duke St, Barrow-in-Furness LA14 1RW, UK on Google Maps

About National probation Service
from Wikipedia

The National Probation Service for England and Wales is a statutory criminal justice service, mainly responsible for the supervision of offenders in the community and the provision of reports to the criminal courts to assist them in their sentencing duties. It was established in its current form by the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act in April 2001, but has existed since 1907 as a set of area based services interacting at arms-length with central government.

Northern Ireland has its own probation service, whilst in Scotland criminal justice social work services are managed within the social work departments of local authorities.

The service is part of the Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS), which transferred to the Ministry of Justice from the Home Office on 9 May 2007. It comprises 42 probation areas which are coterminous with police force area boundaries, served by 35 probation trusts. Trusts are funded by NOMS and employ all staff except the chief officer; they are accountable to their boards (comprising up to fifteen members appointed by the Secretary of State) for day-to-day operations and financial management, and to NOMS via a Regional Offender Manager, with whom they have service level agreements, for performance against the targets for the offender management and interventions services for which they have been funded.

The work of probation trusts is scrutinised by NOMS, which reports independently to UK government ministers; and by HM Inspectorate of Probation. There are concerns that staff shortages, failure in communication and privatisation may be weakening the probation service and putting the public at risk.[1]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Criticism
3 See also
4 Notes
5 External links
History[edit]
The Church of England Temperance Society and other voluntary societies appointed missionaries to the London police courts during the late nineteenth century. From this developed the system of releasing offenders on the condition that they kept in touch with the missionary and accepted guidance. In 1907 this supervision was given a statutory basis which allowed courts to appoint and employ probation officers.[2]

The service, at the start of 2004, had some 18,000 staff. Statistics for the year 2002 state that it supervised just less than 193,000 offenders and provided 253,000 pre-sentence reports to courts in England and Wales, advising them on the background of and proposing appropriate sentences for convicted offenders. In addition, it has responsibility for ensuring that victims of violent and sexual crime resulting in prison sentences of over 12 months are consulted before offenders are released from custody.

The advent of NOMS in 2004 changed the pattern of correctional services delivery in England and Wales. The Offender Management Bill, introduced in Parliament late in 2006, was intended to enable probation areas to become trusts as part of wider government policy to open up the provision of correctional services to greater competition from the voluntary, community, and private sectors. This was one of the recommendations of the Carter Report (2003): others were to introduce a system of end-to-end offender management, with one named offender manager having responsibility for an offender throughout his or her sentence (be it in custody, the community, or both), and to rebalance sentencing in order to redress the drift towards less and less serious offences resulting in imprisonment or community sentences. Carter saw the need to improve public and sentencer confidence not only in community sentences but also in the fine as credible sanctions for appropriate offenders and offences.

The Bill completed its passage through Parliament in July 2007, and the first six probation trusts came into being on 1 April 2008 (Merseyside, South Wales, Humberside, Dyfed/Powys, West Mercia and Leicestershire & Rutland). Lancashire Probation Trust achieved Trust status on 1 April 2009.

Criticism[edit]
An article in The Guardian suggests privatisation of the probation service was done in haste, underfunded and is failing.[3]

The probation service in London is understaffed and many probation officers are inexperienced. Probationers are seen too infrequently and some are overlooked. A proper risk assessment is not done in the majority of cases.[4] Pivatisation of probation service continues to produce “troubling” results. The Chief Inspector of Pobation disclosed that probation supervision for one in four low-risk offenders in Gwent is no more than a phone call every six weeks.[5] HM Inspectorate of Probation maintains half of cases have no proper assessment of risk of harm. Junior officers working for Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) sometimes manage over 200 cases each though at most 60 can be managed safely.[6]

Not enough is done to supervise former prisoners after release from jail and disccourage reoffending. Glenys Stacey, Chief Inspector of Probation said, “Although there are exceptions, the community rehabilitation companies… are not generally producing good quality work, not at all.”[7]

National Probation Service, The Court House, The Inhedge, Dudley DY1 1RR, UK

According to Google Maps, this is an National Probation Service location.

Address:
National Probation Service, The Court House, The Inhedge, Dudley DY1 1RR, UK

Opening hours:
We are unable to advise on the opening times for this location.

See the National Probation Service’s directory of community rehabilitation companies on the Gov.UK website here.

Useful Government telephone numbers:

Department Call Connection Phone Numbers - we are in no way affiliated with any organisation mentioned
Child Support Agency (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 7325
Child Support Agency enquiries (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 538 5227
Child Maintenance Service enuiries (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 8306
CSA Applications (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0002
Child Maintenance Options (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 515 9404
Official Employment Tribunal listings site Click Here
Tax Code (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0106
Corporation Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 504 0052
Tax Credits (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2578
Inheritance Tax (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 506 0299
Tax Rebate (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2577
Child Tax Credit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2445
Working Tax Credit (Calls cost 7ppm + network charges)
0843 509 2443
Tax Office (HMRC) (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0147
Income Support (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0249
Incapacity Benefit (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2466
Universal Credit (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2346
Universal Credit (New Claims & Appointments) (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0140
Social Fund (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2467
Maternity Allowance (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0905 481 0145
Personal Independence Payment (Calls cost £1.50 connection fee plus £1.50 per minute plus your phone provider’s access charge)
0903 871 2350

Directions:
Click here for directions to National Probation Service, The Court House, The Inhedge, Dudley DY1 1RR, UK on Google Maps

About National probation Service
from Wikipedia

The National Probation Service for England and Wales is a statutory criminal justice service, mainly responsible for the supervision of offenders in the community and the provision of reports to the criminal courts to assist them in their sentencing duties. It was established in its current form by the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act in April 2001, but has existed since 1907 as a set of area based services interacting at arms-length with central government.

Northern Ireland has its own probation service, whilst in Scotland criminal justice social work services are managed within the social work departments of local authorities.

The service is part of the Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS), which transferred to the Ministry of Justice from the Home Office on 9 May 2007. It comprises 42 probation areas which are coterminous with police force area boundaries, served by 35 probation trusts. Trusts are funded by NOMS and employ all staff except the chief officer; they are accountable to their boards (comprising up to fifteen members appointed by the Secretary of State) for day-to-day operations and financial management, and to NOMS via a Regional Offender Manager, with whom they have service level agreements, for performance against the targets for the offender management and interventions services for which they have been funded.

The work of probation trusts is scrutinised by NOMS, which reports independently to UK government ministers; and by HM Inspectorate of Probation. There are concerns that staff shortages, failure in communication and privatisation may be weakening the probation service and putting the public at risk.[1]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Criticism
3 See also
4 Notes
5 External links
History[edit]
The Church of England Temperance Society and other voluntary societies appointed missionaries to the London police courts during the late nineteenth century. From this developed the system of releasing offenders on the condition that they kept in touch with the missionary and accepted guidance. In 1907 this supervision was given a statutory basis which allowed courts to appoint and employ probation officers.[2]

The service, at the start of 2004, had some 18,000 staff. Statistics for the year 2002 state that it supervised just less than 193,000 offenders and provided 253,000 pre-sentence reports to courts in England and Wales, advising them on the background of and proposing appropriate sentences for convicted offenders. In addition, it has responsibility for ensuring that victims of violent and sexual crime resulting in prison sentences of over 12 months are consulted before offenders are released from custody.

The advent of NOMS in 2004 changed the pattern of correctional services delivery in England and Wales. The Offender Management Bill, introduced in Parliament late in 2006, was intended to enable probation areas to become trusts as part of wider government policy to open up the provision of correctional services to greater competition from the voluntary, community, and private sectors. This was one of the recommendations of the Carter Report (2003): others were to introduce a system of end-to-end offender management, with one named offender manager having responsibility for an offender throughout his or her sentence (be it in custody, the community, or both), and to rebalance sentencing in order to redress the drift towards less and less serious offences resulting in imprisonment or community sentences. Carter saw the need to improve public and sentencer confidence not only in community sentences but also in the fine as credible sanctions for appropriate offenders and offences.

The Bill completed its passage through Parliament in July 2007, and the first six probation trusts came into being on 1 April 2008 (Merseyside, South Wales, Humberside, Dyfed/Powys, West Mercia and Leicestershire & Rutland). Lancashire Probation Trust achieved Trust status on 1 April 2009.

Criticism[edit]
An article in The Guardian suggests privatisation of the probation service was done in haste, underfunded and is failing.[3]

The probation service in London is understaffed and many probation officers are inexperienced. Probationers are seen too infrequently and some are overlooked. A proper risk assessment is not done in the majority of cases.[4] Pivatisation of probation service continues to produce “troubling” results. The Chief Inspector of Pobation disclosed that probation supervision for one in four low-risk offenders in Gwent is no more than a phone call every six weeks.[5] HM Inspectorate of Probation maintains half of cases have no proper assessment of risk of harm. Junior officers working for Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) sometimes manage over 200 cases each though at most 60 can be managed safely.[6]

Not enough is done to supervise former prisoners after release from jail and disccourage reoffending. Glenys Stacey, Chief Inspector of Probation said, “Although there are exceptions, the community rehabilitation companies… are not generally producing good quality work, not at all.”[7]

Probation Service, 14 Market St, Caernarfon LL55 1RT, UK

According to Google Maps, this is an National Probation Service location.

Address:
Probation Service, 14 Market St, Caernarfon LL55 1RT, UK

Opening hours:
We are unable to advise on the opening times for this location.

See the National Probation Service’s directory of community rehabilitation companies on the Gov.UK website here.

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About National probation Service
from Wikipedia

The National Probation Service for England and Wales is a statutory criminal justice service, mainly responsible for the supervision of offenders in the community and the provision of reports to the criminal courts to assist them in their sentencing duties. It was established in its current form by the Criminal Justice and Court Services Act in April 2001, but has existed since 1907 as a set of area based services interacting at arms-length with central government.

Northern Ireland has its own probation service, whilst in Scotland criminal justice social work services are managed within the social work departments of local authorities.

The service is part of the Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS), which transferred to the Ministry of Justice from the Home Office on 9 May 2007. It comprises 42 probation areas which are coterminous with police force area boundaries, served by 35 probation trusts. Trusts are funded by NOMS and employ all staff except the chief officer; they are accountable to their boards (comprising up to fifteen members appointed by the Secretary of State) for day-to-day operations and financial management, and to NOMS via a Regional Offender Manager, with whom they have service level agreements, for performance against the targets for the offender management and interventions services for which they have been funded.

The work of probation trusts is scrutinised by NOMS, which reports independently to UK government ministers; and by HM Inspectorate of Probation. There are concerns that staff shortages, failure in communication and privatisation may be weakening the probation service and putting the public at risk.[1]

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Criticism
3 See also
4 Notes
5 External links
History[edit]
The Church of England Temperance Society and other voluntary societies appointed missionaries to the London police courts during the late nineteenth century. From this developed the system of releasing offenders on the condition that they kept in touch with the missionary and accepted guidance. In 1907 this supervision was given a statutory basis which allowed courts to appoint and employ probation officers.[2]

The service, at the start of 2004, had some 18,000 staff. Statistics for the year 2002 state that it supervised just less than 193,000 offenders and provided 253,000 pre-sentence reports to courts in England and Wales, advising them on the background of and proposing appropriate sentences for convicted offenders. In addition, it has responsibility for ensuring that victims of violent and sexual crime resulting in prison sentences of over 12 months are consulted before offenders are released from custody.

The advent of NOMS in 2004 changed the pattern of correctional services delivery in England and Wales. The Offender Management Bill, introduced in Parliament late in 2006, was intended to enable probation areas to become trusts as part of wider government policy to open up the provision of correctional services to greater competition from the voluntary, community, and private sectors. This was one of the recommendations of the Carter Report (2003): others were to introduce a system of end-to-end offender management, with one named offender manager having responsibility for an offender throughout his or her sentence (be it in custody, the community, or both), and to rebalance sentencing in order to redress the drift towards less and less serious offences resulting in imprisonment or community sentences. Carter saw the need to improve public and sentencer confidence not only in community sentences but also in the fine as credible sanctions for appropriate offenders and offences.

The Bill completed its passage through Parliament in July 2007, and the first six probation trusts came into being on 1 April 2008 (Merseyside, South Wales, Humberside, Dyfed/Powys, West Mercia and Leicestershire & Rutland). Lancashire Probation Trust achieved Trust status on 1 April 2009.

Criticism[edit]
An article in The Guardian suggests privatisation of the probation service was done in haste, underfunded and is failing.[3]

The probation service in London is understaffed and many probation officers are inexperienced. Probationers are seen too infrequently and some are overlooked. A proper risk assessment is not done in the majority of cases.[4] Pivatisation of probation service continues to produce “troubling” results. The Chief Inspector of Pobation disclosed that probation supervision for one in four low-risk offenders in Gwent is no more than a phone call every six weeks.[5] HM Inspectorate of Probation maintains half of cases have no proper assessment of risk of harm. Junior officers working for Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) sometimes manage over 200 cases each though at most 60 can be managed safely.[6]

Not enough is done to supervise former prisoners after release from jail and disccourage reoffending. Glenys Stacey, Chief Inspector of Probation said, “Although there are exceptions, the community rehabilitation companies… are not generally producing good quality work, not at all.”[7]